Table of contents for Games that sell! / by Mark H. Walker.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog. Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication information provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


Counter
Introduction
Part 1: Theory
Chapter 1: What Makes Games Sell
Topic
Quality
Marketing and Public Relations
Range of Appeal
Cool Factor
The Final Topic
Chapter 2: Game Genres
Action
Strategy
Adventure
Role-Playing Games
Sports
Simulations
Puzzle or Classic Games
Console Games
So What's the Point?
So, The Winner Is.
Chapter 3: Licensing and Franchising
To License or Not to License
To Franchise or Not to Franchise
What the Industry Says about Franchises and Licenses
The Final License
Chapter 4: Topic--Your Gaming World, Cool or Not
Thinking with Your Heart
Tradition Says
Find the Golden Nugget
Insiders Talk
     Mario Kroll, The Wargamer Network
     Bill Mooney, Simon & Schuster
     Jonah Falcon, United Gamers Online
Cool Factor
The Final Topic
Part 2: Ambiance and Story
Chapter 5: Ambiance
Graphics
Audio
Physical Stimuli
Chapter 6: Story
Who Needs Story?
Why Not?
Making the Story
Write It Down
Conflict
The Right Tool for the Job
The Final Wordware Publishing, Inc.
Chapter 7: Documentation and Strategy Guides
User Manuals
The Writer
The Strategy Guide
Chapter 8: Playing the Game--the Fun Factor
When is Fun, Fun?
     Steve Bauman, Computer Games Magazine
     Jim Werbaneth, Publisher, Line of Departure
     Randy Sluganski, Just Adventure
     Steve Grammont, Battlefront.com
     Howard Jones, author
     Tom Ham, E3 Judge
     John Keefer, GameSpy Network
     Tiffancy Spencer, UbiSoft
     Scott Osborne, Journalist
     Bill Roper, Blizzard Entertainment
Fun Is as Fun Does
Part 3: Marketing and Public Relations
Chapter 9: Public Relations and Marketing
Building a Theme
Creating a Buzz
Involve the Press
The Last Review
Chapter 10: Marketing the Product
Public Relations
     Know the Game
     Know Your Public Relations Representative
     Know Your Editor
     Screen Shots
     Demonstrate the Game
Marketing
     Original Equipment Manufacturers
The Final Advertisement
Part 4: Appeal and Cool Factor
Chapter 11: Range of Appeal
Scalability
Technology
Switch Hitting and Cross Breeding
Part 5: Been There and Back
Chapter 12: Empire Earth--Mark One Up for Marketing
Quality
Topic
     Genre
Gameplay
Cool Factor
Marketing and Public Relations
Summary
Chapter 13: Max Payne--Cool Cash
Quality
Topic
     Genre
Gameplay
Cool Factor
Marketing and Public Relations
Summary
Chapter 14: Diablo 2--Lords of Destruction
Quality
Topic
Gameplay
Cool Factor
Marketing and Public Relations
Summary
Chapter 15: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone--The Movie Sells the Game
Quality
Topic
Gameplay
Cool Factor
Marketing and Public Relations
Summary
Chapter 16: Sim Theme Park--An Amusement Park in Your Home
Quality
Topic
Gameplay
Cool Factor
Marketing and Public Relations
Summary
Chapter 17: RollerCoaster Tycoon
Quality
Topic
Gameplay
Cool Factor
Marketing and Public Relations
Summary
Chapter 18: The Sims
Quality
Topic
Gameplay
Cool Factor
Marketing and Public Relations
Summary
Chapter 19: Age of Empires II
Quality
Topic
Gameplay
Cool Factor
Marketing and Public Relations
Summary
Chapter 20: Games That Should Have Sold but Didn't
Poor Public Relations
Lack of Distribution
Poor Press
Poor Timing
Games That Should Have Sold but Didn't
     Ground Control
     101: The Airborne Invasion of Normandy
     Grand Prix Legends
The Final Sale
Part 6: Speaking Out
Chapter 21: Insiders Speak Out
Jason Bell, Infogrames, Inc.
Bonnie James, Electric Playground
Ben Smith
Mark Barrett
Kelly Ekins, Strategy First
Jeff Vitous, The Wargamer
Christina Ginger, Strategy First
Pro Sotos, Producer, Disciples and Disciples II
Dan Clark, Gaming Nexus
Jim Werbaneth, Publisher, Line of Departure
The Final Question
Chapter 22: Fans Speak Out
The Questions
     What influences your gaming purchases? 
     Which is more important--the publisher or the developer?
     If you buy a stinker from a publisher, will you buy a subsequent game from the same 
publisher?
     What was your favorite game of the last 24 months?
     Would you buy a game on impulse if it was connected with a license you enjoy?
     Does the game's genre strongly affect your purchase?
     What is your favorite genre?
     If you read a glowing review, would you buy the game?
The Gamers Speak Out
Index
 

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication: Video games Marketing, Video games Evaluation