Table of contents for The pristine Dao : metaphysics in early Daoist discourse / Thomas Michael.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 Acknowledgements................................................................................v
 Note on the Texts.................................................................................vii
						
I.	 Early Daoism and Metaphysics............................................................1
	
 II.	 Early Daoism and Cosmogony..........................................................11
	 	II.1:	Before the World...........................................................11
II.2:	The Xicizhuan: An Alternative Cosmogony of the 			
		Confucian Tradition...............................................21
		II.3:	Abyssal Waters............................................................25
		II.4:	Placental Waters...........................................................36
III. Early Daoism and Cosmology............................................................52
III.1:	The Harmonious World....................................................52 
III.2:	Was There An Early Daoist Cosmology Before the Laozi?..........55
		III.3.	The Hidden Sage Is Not A Public King.................................63
		III.4.	Why Politics and Religion Don't Mix; Or Do They?.................81
		III.5.	The World Was Born Not Made..........................................89
		III.6.	Sages Live The Adventure.................................................96
IV. Early Daoism and Ontology...........................................................112 
IV.1.	The Fractured World.......................................................112
IV.2.	Splitting Binary Differences: The Ontological Vision of 		
		the Laozi............................................................116 
 VI.3.	Human Labor Gets a Turn: The Ontological Vision 	of the		
		 Qiwulun...........................................................129
	
V.	Early Daoism and Soteriology........................................................156
	V.1	The Healed World..........................................................156
	V.2.	The Neiye Describes the Body as Jing..................................165
	V.3.	The Laozi Describes the Newborn Body...............................178
	V.4.	The Zhuangzi Describes the Body as Heaven........................189 
	V.5.	The Huainanzi Describes the Correlative Body .....................211
VI.	Early Daoism and Modernity.........................................................233
Endnotes...........................................................................................244
Bibliography.....................................................................................264
	v
	
Index

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Taoism.
Philosophy, Taoist.
Cosmogony, Ancient.