Table of contents for Otto Dempwolff's Grammar of the Jabem language in New Guinea / translated and edited by Joel Bradshaw and Francisc Czobor.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Contents
Foreword	ix
Translators' preface	xi
References	xiii
A. The morphology of Jabêm
I. The sounds and their spelling	1
§ 1 Acoustics of sounds	1
§ 2 Physiology of sounds	1
§ 3 Definition of the "phoneme"	2
§ 4 The phonemes of Jabêm	2
§ 5 Vowel timbre	3
§ 6 Vowel pitch (tone)	3
§ 7 Vowel onsets and offsets	4
§ 8 Absence of semivowels	4
§ 9 Consonant timbre	5
§ 10 Consonants and tone	5
§ 11 Consonant clusters	5
§ 12 Words as sound sequences, examples	6
§ 13 Co-occurrence restrictions	7
II. Word formation	8
§ 14 Roots, stems, affixation	8
§ 15 Compounding	9
§ 16 Reduplication	9
III. Sentence articulation and construction	10
§ 17 Sentence articulation	10
§ 18 Sentence components	10
B. The psychology of words (lexicology)
Preliminary remarks	11
§ 19 Rejection of European grammatical models	11
§ 20 A psychological basis for description	11
I. Event words (verbs)	12
§ 21 Realis and irrealis	12
§ 22 Subject prefixes	13
§ 23 First conjugation	14
§ 24 Second conjugation	14
§ 25 Third conjugation	16
§ 26 Fourth conjugation	18
§ 27 Fifth conjugation	18
§ 28 Combining events	19
§ 29 Linking with other notions	20
§ 30 Absence of derivation	21
II. Entity words (nouns = substantives)	21
§ 31 Individuals and types	21
§ 32 Possessive suffixes	22
§ 33 Related morphophonemics	24
§ 34 Possessive markers	25
§ 35 The genitive	26
§ 36 Combining entities	27
§ 37 Transforming entities	28
§ 38 Linking with other notions	28
§ 39 Linking with feelings	29
§ 40 Derivation of nouns	30
III. Attribute words (qualitatives = adjectives)	30
§ 41 Different formation of qualitatives	30
§ 42 Linking with other notions	32
IV. Substitute words (pronouns)	32
§ 43 Personal pronouns	32
§ 44 Demonstrative pronouns	34
§ 45 Other pronouns	37
§ 46 Interrogative pronouns	38
V. Relations of space, time, quantity and circumstance	38
§ 47 Impersonal locatives	38
§ 48 Personal locatives	41
§ 49 Other locatives	42
§ 50 Referring and questioning	46
§ 51 Time	47
§ 52 Quantity	52
§ 53 Circumstance, instrumental	54
§ 54 Circumstance, comitative, privative	55
§ 55 Circumstance, motivating	57
§ 56 Circumstance by comparison	58
VI. Remaining lexical classes	60
§ 57 Qualitatives as adverbs	60
§ 58 Other adverbs (resultatives)	63
§ 59 Expressions of evaluation (degree)	65
§ 60 Onomatopoeia, interjections	67
C. The psychology of sentences (syntax)
Preliminary remarks	69
§ 61 Sentence types	69
I. Simple sentences	69
§ 62 Subject and predicate	69
§ 63 Negation	71
§ 64 Evaluation	72
§ 65 Emphasis [and Identification]	73
§ 66 Yes/no questions	74
§ 67 Content questions	77
§ 68 Imperatives	78
§ 69 Vocatives	79
§ 70 Multiple subjects and predicates	80
II. Expanded sentences	83
§ 71 Verbal objects	83
§ 72 Locative objects	85
§ 73 Adverbs	88
§ 74 Prepositions	90
§ 75 Suffixes (postpositions)	90
§ 76 Adnominal appositional phrases	91
§ 77 Adnominal prepositional and postpositional phrases	92
§ 78 Pronominal attributives (possessives)	94
§ 79 Nominal attributives (genitives)	97
§ 80 Other expansions	99
III. Combined sentences	100
§ 81 Serialization	100
§ 82 Clauses in place of words	102
§ 83 Temporal conjunctions: ma 'and then', go 'after', è 'until'	103
§ 84 Adversative conjunctions: ma 'but', mago 'although'	107
§ 85 Subordinating conjunctions: tec, na? 'there, where, thus, so'	107
§ 86 Relative clauses	108
§ 87 Adverbial subordinators: to, -tu ... -?a, -dê? ... na?, ta? ... na?	111
§ 88 Causal/purposive gebe	112
§ 89 Complementizer gebe	114
§ 90 Conditional èmbe	115

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Yabim language -- Grammar.