Table of contents for Scheduling construction projects : principles and practices / Sandra Christensen Weber.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog.

Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Table of Contents
SECTION I SCHEDULING BASICS	1
CHAPTER 1 ? INTRODUCTION	1
Advantages of Construction Schedules.	2
Schedule Generation.	2
Schedule Use in Pre-planning.	4
History of Scheduling.	6
Computerization.	7
Schedule as a Monitor of Project Success.	9
Conclusion.	9
CHAPTER 2 ? ACTIVITIES, TASKS, AND PRODUCTION	11
Identify tasks and Level of Detail/Control.	12
Task Identification.	13
Activity Descriptions and Identifications.	14
Durations.	16
Example.	20
Conclusion.	23
CHAPTER 3 ? BAR CHARTS	29
Introduction.	29
Bar chart graphical techniques.	30
Advantages.	37
Disadvantages.	37
Example.	38
Histograms and S-curves.	39
CHAPTER 4 ? PRECEDENCE NETWORKS	46
Introduction.	46
Creating Network Logic.	50
Network creation example.	54
Determine the project duration.	59
Forward Pass.	59
Backward Pass.	63
Finish-to-Start with Lag Value Greater Than Zero.	65
Other Relationship Types.	66
Start to Start.	66
Finish to Finish.	69
Start to Finish.	71
Redundancies.	72
Float.	73
Fragnets.	76
Example.	77
Loops.	77
CHAPTER 5 ? RESOURCE ALLOCATION	85
Introduction.	85
Resource and Cost Descriptions.	88
Resource Assignments to Schedule.	88
Activity Cost Theory.	90
Day-at-a-Time Crashing	97
Modified Siemens? Algorithm for Crashing.	104
Project Costs.	115
Fondahl?s Envelope Example.	117
Questions and/or Problems.	122
CHAPTER 6 ? LEVELING AND CONSTRAINING	129
Introduction.	129
Leveling.	130
Conventional/Traditional Resource Leveling.	131
Selecting the Trial Resource Level.	134
Moving Activities.	135
Constraining.	138
Problems and/or Questions.	140
SECTION III SCHEDULE CONTROL, MONITORING, AND MANAGEMENT	145
CHAPTER 7 ? CONSTRAINTS	145
Introduction.	145
Start Constraints.	146
Mandatory Constraints.	148
Constraints versus Relationships with Lag Values	150
Creating Zero Total Float and Zero Free Float	152
Conclusion.	154
Problems and/or Questions.	155
CHAPTER 8 ? UPDATING	157
Introduction.	157
Monitoring Schedule Progress.	158
Updating Resources and Costs.	165
Changes to network components (durations, description, ?).	165
Analysis.	166
Changes to correct problems or errors.	167
Reporting.	167
Problems and/or Questions.	169
CHAPTER 9 ? EARNED VALUE	172
Introduction.	172
Earned Value Calculations and Reporting.	172
Measures of Performance.	175
Analysis of the Measures of Performance.	178
Other Resource Allocation Schemes.	182
CHAPTER 10 ? REPORTING	188
Introduction.	188
Report Preparation.	189
Narrative.	189
Recipients.	190
Tabular Report Content.	191
Report Sorting.	192
Report Selection Criteria.	197
Report Interpretation.	198
Red Flags.	198
Negative Floats.	198
Negative Lag Values.	199
Activity Build-up on the Data Date.	199
Slipped Project Duration.	199
Other Flags.	200
Example Reports.	201
Request for payment based on schedule.	204
Value of historical schedule information.	204
Specification Reporting Requirements.	205
Problems and/or Questions.	206
CHAPTER 11 ? CHANGE ORDERS AND CLAIMS	207
Introduction.	207
Use of the Schedule to Aid Change Order Preparation.	208
Developing a schedule to support potential claims.	208
The role of float and the meaning of criticality.	210
Change Orders.	212
Schedule Documentation.	215
Impacted Baseline Schedule.	218
But-for or Collapsed As-built Schedule.	219
The Role of the Schedule in the Construction Process.	221
Problems and/or Questions.	223
CHAPTER 12 ? SCHEDULE ANALYSIS	224
Evaluating the Company?s Schedule.	224
Project Sequencing and Methodology.	225
Progress.	226
Evaluating a Subcontractor?s Schedule.	226
Project evaluation with the bar chart.	228
Implied Logic.	228
Activity Durations.	229
Activity Timing.	229
Project evaluation using the network.	229
Problems and/or Questions.	231
SECTION IV ADVANCED AND ALTERNATE SCHEDULING TECHNIQUES	232
CHAPTER 13 ? LINEAR SCHEDULING	232
Introduction.	232
Durations.	235
The Activity Represented on the Diagram.	238
Activities Found at One Location.	239
Relationships.	240
Buffers.	241
Float.	243
Updating.	245
Reading the Diagram.	247
Example 1 ? Earthwork LSM.	248
Example 2 ? Apartment Building.	249
Problems and/or Questions.	252
CHAPTER 14 ? ACTIVITY ON ARROW NETWORKS	255
Introduction.	256
The Network Diagram.	261
Redundancies.	263
Loops.	263
Diagramming Basics.	264
Network Calculations.	265
Forward Pass.	265
Backward Pass.	269
Float.	273
Using Tables.	275
Virtual Activities.	278
Conclusion.	279
Problems and/or Questions.	281
CHAPTER 15 ? PROGRAM EVALUATION AND REVIEW TECHNIQUE	286
Statistics Review.	287
PERT Diagramming.	290
Activity Durations.	291
Network Calculations.	292
Calculating the Probability of Meeting Deadline Dates.	293
Problems and/or Questions.	302
CHAPTER 16 ? MINIMUM MOMENT LEVELING METHOD	306
Introduction.	306
Minimum Moment Method of Resource Leveling.	306
Finding the Minimum Moment.	308
Finding the Improvement Factor.	310
Back Float.	314
Minimum Moment Procedure.	317
Resource Improvement Coefficient.	323
Problems and/or Questions.	326
CHAPTER 17 ? LEVELING MULTIPLE RESOURCES	331
Introduction.	331
The Burgess Method.	331
Problems and/or Questions.	336
CHAPTER 18 ? MULTIPLE PROJECT SCHEDULING	341
Introduction	341
Company-wide Resources	341
Managing Resources in a Larger Context	347
Creating Summary Activities	352
Merging Projects Using P3	355
Reports to Aid Company Decision Makers	356
Problems and/or Questions.	357
ENDNOTES	358

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Building industry -- Management.
Building -- Superintendence.
Production scheduling.