Table of contents for Urban multilingualism in Europe : immigrant minority languages at home and school / edited by Guus Extra and Kutlay Yagmur.

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Contents
1 Introduction 1
Part I
Multidisciplinary perspectives
GUUS EXTRA & KUTLAY YA-MUR
2 Phenomenological perspectives 11
2.1 Ethnic identity and identification 11
2.2 Language and identity 14
2.3 The European discourse on foreigners and integration 20
3 Demographic perspectives 25
3.1 The European context 26
3.2 Australia 32
3.3 Canada 41
3.4 The United States of America 49
3.5 South Africa 54
3.6 Great Britain and Sweden 62
3.7 Conclusions and discussion 66
4 Language rights perspectives 73
4.1 Multilingualism as social reality 73
4.2 Global perspectives on language rights 77
4.3 European perspectives on language rights 83
4.4 Concluding remarks 89
5 Educational perspectives 93
5.1 Mother Tongue Education in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany 93
5.2 Languages Other Than English in Victoria State, Australia 99
vi Urban Multilingualism in Europe
Part II
Multilingual Cities Project: national and local perspectives
6 Methodological considerations 109
GUUS EXTRA, KUTLAY YA-MUR & TIM VAN DER AVOIRD
6.1 Rationale 109
6.2 Research goals 111
6.3 Design of the language survey questionnaire 112
6.4 Data collection 114
6.5 Data processing 116
6.6 Measuring language distribution 118
6.7 Specifying home language profiles 121
6.8 Measuring language vitality 125
6.9 Comparing the status of community languages at school 128
6.10 Outlook 130
7 Multilingualism in Göteborg 133
LILIAN NYGREN-JUNKIN
7.1 Background information 133
7.2 Home language instruction and home language statistics in Sweden 134
7.3 Home language survey in Göteborg 140
7.4 Home language instruction in primary and secondary schools 149
7.5 Conclusions and discussion 158
8 Multilingualism in Hamburg 163
SABINE BÜHLER-OTTEN & SARA FÜRSTENAU
8.1 Multicultural and multilingual trends in the city 163
8.2 Home language survey in Hamburg 166
8.3 Focus on Polish and Russian in Hamburg: the case of Aussiedler 173
8.4 Muttersprachlicher Unterricht in primary and secondary schools 179
8.5 Conclusions and discussion 187
9 Multilingualism in The Hague 193
RIAN AARTS, GUUS EXTRA & KUTLAY YA-MUR
9.1 Demographic trends 193
9.2 Home language survey in The Hague 196
9.3 OALT and ONST in primary and secondary schools 203
9.4 Parental needs for language instruction in primary schools 210
9.5 Conclusions and discussion 216
Contents vii
10 Multilingualism in Brussels 221
MARC VERLOT & KAAT DELRUE
10.1 The politicisation of language in Brussels 222
10.2 Home language survey in Brussels 228
10.3 Home language instruction in primary schools 238
10.4 Conclusions and discussion 245
11 Multilingualism in Lyon 251
MEHMET-ALI AKINCI & JAN JAAP DE RUITER
11.1 Immigrant minority groups and their languages in France 251
11.2 The teaching of languages other than French 256
11.3 Home language survey in Lyon 261
11.4 Home language instruction in primary and secondary schools 267
11.5 Conclusions and discussion 272
12 Multilingualism in Madrid 275
PETER BROEDER & LAURA MIJARES
12.1 Immigrant minority children in Spain and Madrid 275
12.2 Home language survey in Madrid 281
12.3 Moroccan and Portuguese ELCO in primary and secondary schools 285
12.4 Conclusions and discussion 296
Part III
Multilingual Cities Project: crossnational and crosslinguistic perspectives
GUUS EXTRA, KUTLAY YA-MUR & TIM VAN DER AVOIRD
13 Crossnational perspectives on language groups 301
13.1 Albanian language group 306
13.2 Arabic language group 309
13.3 Armenian language group 312
13.4 Berber language group 315
13.5 Chinese language group 318
13.6 English language group 321
13.7 French language group 324
13.8 German language group 327
13.9 Italian language group 330
13.10 Kurdish language group 333
13.11 Polish language group 336
13.12 Portuguese language group 339
viii Urban Multilingualism in Europe
13.13 Romani/Sinte language group 342
13.14 Russian language group 345
13.15 Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian language group 348
13.16 Somali language group 351
13.17 Spanish language group 354
13.18 Turkish language group 357
13.19 Urdu/'Pakistani' language group 360
13.20 Vietnamese language group 363
14 Crosslinguistic perspectives on language groups 367
14.1 Overview of the crosslinguistic database 367
14.2 Crosslinguistic perspectives on language dimensions 369
14.3 Crosslinguistic perspectives on language vitality 375
15 Crossnational perspectives on community language teaching 379
15.1 Community language teaching in primary and secondary education 379
15.2 Community language teaching: participation and need 387
16 Conclusions and discussion 393
16.1 In retrospect 393
16.2 Dealing with multilingualism at school 401
Appendices
1 English version of the language survey questionnaire 411
2 Multicultural policy for schools in Victoria State, Australia 415
3 Language descriptions 417
4 Authors and affiliations 427

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication:

Multilingualism -- Europe.
Linguistic minorities -- Europe.
Immigrants -- Europe -- Language.
Language and education -- Europe.