Table of contents for Sacred snakes : orthodox images of Indian snake worship / Laurie Cozad.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog. Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Contents
Textual Timeline......................................................................ix
Chapter 1	Introduction: Snake Worshippers, Orthodox Redactors 	and Their Contextual Tug-of-War...........................................1
Chapter 2	The g Veda and the Threat of the Sovereign Snake.............13
Vtra: The Demonization of the Sovereign Snake
The Buried Elements of the Snake Worshippers' Buried Discourse
Conclusion: Redactors and Rival Traditions 
Chapter 3 	The Late Vedas: Revering the Snake's Power and Preserving Snake-Centered Rituals......................................23
Snake Worship During the Late Vedic Period
The Deification of the Powerful Snake
Arbuda Kdraveya: The Transformation and Anthropomorphization of the g Vedic Snake
The Sarpavidy: The Science of Snakes
The Sarpasattra: The Sacrifice Performed by the Snakes
Arbuda Kdraveya and his Family 
Dhtarra Airvata, Takaka Vaileya, and Vsuki: The Valorization of Regional Snakes and the Formalization of Land-Related Rituals
Names and Localized Sovereignty
Snake Rituals: Protecting the Populace and Insuring Prosperity
Conclusion: Revering the Sovereign Snake as an Independent, Approachable Deity
Chapter 4 The di Parvan of the Mahbhrata: The Epic Redactors Take On the Snake..............................................47
The Dethronement of the Late Vedic Snakes
King Takaka and King Vsuki: The Redactors Take Aim
ea/Ananta: The Supplantation of the Sovereign Snake
stka: The Incorporation of the Snake
Conclusion: The Upside of the Downtrodden Snake
Chapter 5 The Pli Texts: The Buddhist Redactors [c]Harm the Snakes............................................................75
The Demonization of the Sovereign Snake: The Ngarja of Uruvel
The Sovereign Snake Becomes a Tutelary Deity: The Ngarja Kla and the Ngarja Mucalinda
Buddhist Ngas and the Resignification of Nga Rituals: The Ngarja Campeyya and the Nga Who Wanted to be a Monk
Conclusion: The Reversal of Ideological Fortunes
Chapter 6 The Mahvastu: The Buddha Shares in the Snake's Largesse.........................................................97
The Nga of Uruvilv and the Construction of the Noble Ngarja
The Ngarjas Kla, Mucilinda, Vinipta, and Sudarana: The Earthly Situating of the Lokottara Buddha
The Ngarja Campaka: The Merging of Power and Piety
The Nga King Elapatra and the Festival of the Four Treasures
Conclusion: Lokottara Buddhas and Earthly Ngas
Chapter 7 Conclusion: It is Hard to Keep a Good Snake Down.........127
Competing Contextual Frameworks
Compatible Contextual Frameworks
Snake Worshippers as Context Constructors
Bibliography.........................................137
Notes................................................147
Index................................................165




Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication: Serpent worship India History, Serpents Religious aspects Hinduism, Serpents Religious aspects Buddhism