Table of contents for Mycorrhizas : anatomy and cell biology / R. Larry Peterson, Hugues B. Massicotte, Lewis H. Melville.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog. Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Contents
Preface, vii
Introduction, 1
Root-microorganism interactions are ubiquitous, 1
Mycorrhizal categories, 1
Dark septate endophytes, 2
Microscopy, 2
Organization of book, 2
References, 2
Recent specialized books on mycorrhizas, 3
Box : Mycorrhizas - the most prevalent symbiosis on earth, 4
Chapter 1. Ectomycorrhizas, 5
A. Introduction, 7
1. Definition, 7
2. Plant species involved, 7
3. Fungal species involved, 7
B. Morphology of ectomtcorrhizas, 7
C. Mantle, 9
D. Hartig net, 22
E. Extraradical mycelium, 23
F. Specialized ectomycorrhizas - tuberculate mycorrhizas, 38
Box 1: The polyphosphate controversy, 30
Box 2: Are water and nutrients able to pass through the mantle, 31
Box 3: Root cells may respond to mycorrhizal fungi by developing as transfer cells, 
32
Box 4: Can ectomycorrhizal fungi really eat rocks?, 39
Box 5: Growing ectomycorrhizal fungi in the lab, 43
Chapter 2. Ectendomycorrhizas, 47
A. Introduction, 47
1. Definition, 47
2. Plant species involved, 47
3. Fungal species involved, 47
B. Structural characteristics, 47
C. Functions, 54
iv
Chapter 3. Arbuscular mycorrhizas, 59
A. Introduction, 59
1. Definition, 59
2. Plant species involved, 59
3. Fungal species involved, 60
B. Intraradical hyphae, 60
C. Arbuscules, 66
D. Intraradical vesicles, 72
E. Extraradical vesicles, 72
F. Extraradical mycelium, 73
G. Spores, 78
Box 6: Do the lower plants have arbucular mycorrhizas?, 64
Box 7: Use of 'hairy roots' in studies with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, 65
Box 8: Plant mutants help unravel colonization events in arbuscular mycorrhizas, 
67
Box 9: What is the nature of the interface between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi 
and
root cells, 70
Box 10: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi harbour intracellular bacteria, 71
Box 11: Dynamic changes in the plant cytoskeleton, 79
Chapter 4. Ericoid mycorrhizas, 85
A. Introduction, 85
1. Definition, 85
2. Plant species involved, 85
3. Fungal species involved, 88
B. Development and structure, 88
C. Extraradical mycelium, 91
D. Functions, 91
Box 12: Liverworts and ericoid species can share common fungal symbionts, 89
Box 13: Investigating the identity of ericoid mycorrhizal fungi, 96
Box 14: Ericoid mycorrhizal fungi access various sources of nitrogen, 97
Chapter 5. Arbutoid mycorrhizas, 101
A. Introduction, 101
1. Definition, 101
2. Plant species involved, 101
3. Fungal species involved, 101
B. Development and structure, 101
C. Functions, 102
v
Chapter 6. Monotropoid mycorrhizas, 113
A. Introduction, 113
1. Definition, 113
2. Plant species involved, 113
3. Fungal species involved, 113
B. Development and structure, 114
C. Functions, 115
Chapter 7. Orchid mycorrhizas, 127
A. Introduction, 127
1. Definition, 127
2. Plant species involved, 127
3. Fungal species involved, 127
B. Orchid seed germination and protocorm formation, 132
C. Seedling establishment and mature plants, 133
D. Functioning of orchid mycorrhizas, 144
Box 15: Orchids as 'cheaters', 145
Box 16: Mycorrhizal fungi alter the cytology of orchid cells, 146
Chapter 8. Dark septate fungal endophytes, 149
A. Introduction, 149
1. Definition, 149
2. Plant species involved, 149
3. Fungal species involved, 149
B. Colonization of roots, 150
C. Functions, 150
References, 157
Glossary, 165
Appendices, 167
Index, 173




Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication: Mycorrhizas