Table of contents for Human rights and development / Peter Uvin.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog. Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication information provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Table of contents
A. Introduction	7
PART I. SOME DEBATES OF RELEVANCE TO THE DEVELOPMENT 
PRACTITIONER	15
CHAPTER 1. BACKGROUND	17
(A) The Big Picture	17
(A) The human rights debates	24
CHAPTER 2. THE LEGAL CHALLENGES	29
(A) The Charge of Euro-centrism	29
(B) The legal solution	34
(B) Weak Cultural Relativism	37
(B) The Affirmative Position	39
(B) The Empiricist Strategy	41
(B) The Philosophical Approach	43
(B) Incremental Change	46
(B) Conclusion	51
(B) Relevance of this Overview for the Development Community	52
(A) The Contested Nature of Second and Third generation Rights	61
(B) Economic, Social and Cultural Rights: Mere Aspirations?	61
(B) The right to development	66
PART II. HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE PRACTICE OF DEVELOPMENT	71
CHAPTER 3. THE BASICS	73
(A) Rhetorical Incorporation	78
CHAPTER 4. POLITICAL CONDITIONALITY	85
(A) History of conditionality	86
(A) Difficulties	89
(A) Beyond aid conditionality	104
(B) Improved Conditionality	105
(B) Selectivity	105
(B) CDF and PRSP	108
(A) Conclusion	114
CHAPTER 5. POSITIVE SUPPORT	123
(A) The practice of positive support	126
(B) From Human Rights to Democracy to Elections	128
(A) The Tools of Positive Support	131
(B) Democratization is non-linear, unpredictable, and sometimes reversible	140
Democratization is not a matter of transplanting Western institutions	143
(B) Civil society support	145
(A) Does positive support (if not all aid) undermine governance by definition?	160
(A) Conclusion	172
(A) Post-Script: The issue of coherence	174
CHAPTER 6. A RIGHTS-BASED APPROACH TO DEVELOPMENT	179
(A) Vision	189
(B) A rights-based approach as a Framework for Analysis	189
(B) Accountability	191
(B) Human rights is a political matter	196
(A) Process	200
(A) Some Practical Implications of a Rights-Based Approach to Development	203
(B) Investing in the Human Rights Law Machinery	203
(B) Capacity Building	206
(B) Advocacy	210
(B) The Violations Approach	214
(B) The Inwards Look.	225
(B) Rule of Law	227
(B) Re-conceptualization of the overall aims of development agencies	235
(B) Choice of New Partners	238
(A) Conclusion	243
CHAPTER 7: FINAL SYNTHESIS AND QUESTIONS	245
(A) A Synthesis of the Arguments	246
(B) Rhetorical Repackaging	247
(B) Conditionality	248
(B) Positive support	253
(B) The rights-based approach to development	257
(A) A Step Back: Big Trends and Questions	262
(A) Choices Among Rights	271
(B) Denial	274
(B) Some Legal Exceptions	275
(B) Empirical reasoning: the priority of economic growth	278
(B) Theoretical Reasoning: Basic Rights	283
(B) Participatory methods	285
(A) A Fear: Is this Agenda too Interventionist?	286
BIBLIOGRAPHY	297




Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication: Human rights, Economic development, Human rights Developing countries