Table of contents for Retrieving the ancients : an introduction to Greek philosophy / David Roochnik.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog. Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication information provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Table of Contents
Introduction
	
	I. Two Reasons to Study Ancient Greek Philosophy..........................................1
	II. The Organization and Strategy of This Book...................................................9
Chapter 1: The Presocratics
	I. Preliminaries.......................................................................................................................................14
	II. Before the Beginning: Hesiod.......................................................................................15
III. The Ionian Philosophers of the Sixth Century..........................................23
		A. The Beginning: Thales of Miletus............................................................23
	
		B. The First Debate: Anaximander v. Anaximenes...........................29
		C. Sixth Century Rationalism: Xenophanes and Pythagoras...36
		D. The Crisis of Sixth Century Philosophy.............................................44
	IV. Heraclitus and Parmenides: Extreme Solutions..........................................46
		A. Heraclitus: Lover of Flux...............................................................................46
		B. Parmenides: Champion of Being......................................................................60
	
	V. Fifth Century Elementalism.................................................................................................72
		A. Democritus: Atomic Theory...............................................................................74
		B. Empedocles: Evolution...........................................................................................86
Chapter 2: The Sophists and Socrates
	I. A New Beginning: The Sophists.....................................................................................97
	II. Protagoras..............................................................................................................................................100
	III. Gorgias.................................................................................................................................................111
	IV. Socrates..............................................................................................................................................117
Chapter 3: Plato
	I. Preliminaries.....................................................................................................................................133
	II. Plato's Critique of the Presocratics................................................................137
	III. Plato's Critique of the Sophists......................................................................148
		A. The "Self-Reference" Argument...................................................................149
		B. The Reductio ad Absurdum..................................................................................151
		
		C. "What is it?" ................................................................................................................158
		D. "The Old Quarrel:" Philosophy v.Sophistry............................168
	IV. Recollection.....................................................................................................................................170
		A. The Phaedo............................................................................................................................170
		B. The Meno..................................................................................................................................176	
	V. The Divided Line and the Form of the Good...................................................182
		A. The Divided Line............................................................................................................186
B. The Form of the Good................................................................................................195
	VI. Eros..................................................................................................................................................................198
	VIII. The Political Implications of the Forms................................................216
Chapter 4: Aristotle
	I. Preliminaries....................................................................................................................................234
	II. Aristotle's Conception of Nature........................................................................242
		A. "By Nature"........................................................................................................................242
		B. Form and Matter............................................................................................................242
		C. The Four Causes............................................................................................................246
	III. Aristotle's Psychology...................................................................................................273
	IV. Teleological Ethics............................................................................................................291
		A. Moral Virtue.....................................................................................................................292
		B. Intellectual Virtue................................................................................................291
	V. Natural Politics........................................................................................................................314
		A. The Political Animal.............................................................................................313
		B. Best Life; Best City..........................................................................................323
	VI. Conclusion..........................................................................................................................................328
List of References...................................................................................................................................................337




Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication: Philosophy, Ancient