Table of contents for The quest for consciousness : a neurobiological approach / Christof Koch.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog. Note: Contents data are machine generated based on pre-publication information provided by the publisher. Contents may have variations from the printed book or be incomplete or contain other coding.


Counter
Contents
Foreword by Francis Crick	xiii
Preface	xv
1	Introduction to the Study of Consciousness	1
1.1	What Needs to Be Explained?	1
1.2	A Spectrum of Answers	4
1.3	Our Approach Is a Pragmatic, Empirical One	11
1.4	The Neuronal Correlates of Consciousness	17
1.5	Recapitulation	20
2	Neurons, the Atoms of Perception	21
2.1	The Machinery of the Cerebral Cortex	22
2.2	Explicit Representation, Columnar Organization, and Essential Nodes	25
2.3	Firing Rates, Oscillations, and Neuronal Synchronization	35
2.4	Recapitulation	47
3	The First Steps in Seeing	49
3.1	The Retina Is a Layered Structure	49
3.2	Color Vision Uses Three Types of Cones	52
3.3	A Hole in the Eye: The Blind Spot	53
3.4	Receptive Fields: A Key Concept for Vision	55
3.5	Multiple Parallel Pathways Exit the Eye	57
3.6	The Superior Colliculus: Another Visual Brain	63
3.7	Recapitulation	66
4	The Primary Visual Cortex as a Prototypical Neocortical Area	69
4.1	Monkey Vision as a Model for Human Vision	70
4.2	The Neocortex Is a Layered, Sheet-Like Structure	71
4.3	A Plethora of Cortical Cell Types	72
4.4	V1: The Main Entry Point for Vision	77
4.5	Recapitulation	85
5	What Are the Neuronal Correlates of Consciousness?	87
5.1	Enabling Factors Necessary for Consciousness	88
5.2	Emotions and the Modulation of Consciousness	93
5.3	Anesthesia and Consciousness	94
5.4	A General Strategy for Circumscribing the NCC	96
5.5	Neuronal Specificity and the NCC	100
5.6	Recapitulation	103
6	The Neuronal Correlates of Consciousness Are Not in the Primary Visual Cortex	105
6.1	You Don't See without V1	105
6.2	Even if You Can't See It, V1 Still Adapts to It	106
6.3	You Don't Dream with V1	108
6.4	Directly Stimulating V1	109
6.5	Monkey V1 Neurons Don't Follow Perception	110
6.6	Recapitulation	113
7	The Architecture of the Cerebral Cortex	117
7.1	If You Want to Understand Function, Seek to Understand Structure	117
7.2	The Cortex Contains a Hierarchical Structure	119
7.3	Thalamus and Cortex: A Tight Embrace	124
7.4	Driving and Modulatory Connections	126
7.5	Ventral and Dorsal Pathways as a Guiding Principle	127
7.6	The Prefrontal Cortex: The Seat of the Executive	129
7.7	Recapitulation	131
8	Going Beyond the Primary Visual Cortex	133
8.1	More Topographic Areas: V2, V3, V3A, and V4	134
8.2	Color Perception and the Fusiform Gyrus	137
8.3	Cortical Area MT Is Specialized to Motion Processing	139
8.4	The Posterior Parietal Cortex, Action, and Spatial Position	145
8.5	The Inferior Temporal Cortex and Object Recognition	147
8.6	Recapitulation	150
9	Attention and Consciousness	153
9.1	Change Blindness, or How a Magician Fools You	155
9.2	Attending to a Region, Feature, or Object	157
9.3	Does Consciousness Require Attention?	162
9.4	The Binding Problem	167
9.5	Recapitulation	170
10	The Neuronal Underpinnings of Attention	173
10.1	Mechanistic Accounts of Attention	174
10.2	Attentional Influences Occur Throughout the Visual Hierarchy	178
10.3	Neglect, or Patients Who Are Not Blind and Yet Can't See	181
10.4	Recapitulation	183
11	Memories and Consciousness	185
11.1	A Fundamental Distinction	186
11.2	A Taxonomy of Long-Term Memory	187
11.3	Short-Term Memory	194
11.4	Fleeting or Iconic Memory	199
11.5	Recapitulation	201
12	What You Can Do Without Being Conscious: The Zombie Within	203
12.1	Zombie Agents in Everyday Life	205
12.2	Vision-for-Perception Is Different from Vision-for-Action	209
12.3	Your Zombie Acts Faster Than You See	211
12.4	Can Zombies Smell?	212
12.5	Recapitulation	214
13	Agnosia, Blindsight, Epilepsy, and Sleep Walking: Clinical Evidence for Zombies	215
13.1	Visual Agnosia	215
13.2	Blindsight	218
13.3	Complex, Focal Epileptic Seizures	221
13.4	Sleepwalking	223
13.5	Zombie Agents and the NCC	224
13.6	A Turing Test for Consciousness?	225
13.7	Recapitulation	226
14	Some Speculations on the Functions of Consciousness	229
14.1	Consciousness as an Executive Summary	231
14.2	Consciousness and the Training of Sensory-Motor Agents	233
14.3	Why the Brain Is Not a Bundle of Zombie Agents	235
14.4	Do Feelings Matter?	235
14.5	Meaning and Neurons	237
14.6	Qualia Are Symbols	239
14.7	What Does This Imply about the Location of the NCC?	242
14.8	Recapitulation	244
15	On Time and Consciousness	247
15.1	How Swift Is Vision?	248
15.2	The All-Or-None Character of Perception	249
15.3	Masking Wipes a Stimulus from Consciousness	253
15.4	Integration and Direct Brain Stimulation	259
15.5	Is Perception Discrete or Continuous?	262
15.6	Recapitulation	265
16	When the Mind Flips: Following the Footprints of Consciousness	267
16.1	Binocular Rivalry: When the Two Eyes Disagree	269
16.2	Where Does Perceptual Suppression Occur?	271
16.3	The Footprints of Consciousness Lead to the Inferotemporal Cortex	274
16.4	Open Questions and Future Experiments	278
16.5	Recapitulation	282
17	Splitting the Brain Splits Consciousness	285
17.1	On the Difficulty of Finding Something if You Don't Know What to Look For	286
17.2	The Two Cerebral Hemispheres Do Not Subserve the Same Functions	288
17.3	Two Conscious Minds in One Body	289
17.4	Recapitulation	292
18	Further Speculations on Thoughts and the Unconscious Homunculus	293
18.1	The Intermediate-Level Theory of Consciousness	294
18.2	The Unconscious Homunculus	296
18.3	The Nature of Qualia	298
18.4	Recapitulation	300
19	A Framework for Consciousness	303
19.1	Ten Working Assumptions to Understand the Mind-Body Problem	304
19.2	Relationship to the Work of Others	310
19.3	Where Do We Go From Here?	311
19.4	Recapitulation	313
20	An Interview	315
Glossary	000
Bibliography	000
Index	000




Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication: Consciousness Physiological aspects, Neurobiology Research