Table of contents for Auch and noch in child and adult German / by Ulrike Nederstigt.


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Chapter 1 Introduction
1.1.	Focus particle in German - a first analysis
1.2.	Acquiring focus particles
1.3.	Some differences between auch and noch in adult German	
1.4.	Constructed examples vs. natural discourse
1.5.	Rationale of this study
1.6.	Organisation of this book
Chapter 2 Focus particles - A review of the literature
2.1.	Introduction
2.2.	The meaning of auch and noch
2.2.1.	The semantics of auch
2.2.2.	The semantics of noch
2.2.3.	The semantics of particle-utterances
2.2.3.1.	Focus accounts
2.2.3.2.	Non-focus accounts
2.2.4.	Summary
2.3.	The syntax of auch and noch
2.3.1.	The word order of German sentences
2.3.2.	The position of focus particles within the utterance
2.3.3.	Theoretical approaches to focus particle syntax
2.3.4.	Summary
2.4.	The prosody of focus particle utterances
2.4.1.	Focus - The location of the pitch accent
2.4.2.	Focus - The tonal realisation of the pitch accent
2.4.3.	Topic accents
2.4.4.	Summary
2.5.	Information structure, focus and the domain of 	application
2.5.1.	Information structure
2.5.2.	Information structure and focus particles
2.5.3.	Summary
2.6.	Conclusion
Chapter 3 Auch and noch in spoken German - Aim, data and method of the study
3.1.	The aim of the study
3.2.	The data
3.2.1.	The Verbmobil Corpus
3.2.2.	The P-MoLL Corpus
3.2.3.	SFB 360 - Situierte Künstliche Kommunikatoren, Universität Bielefeld
3.2.4.	Radio and TV broadcasts (Media) 
3.3.	The method
3.3.1.	Identifying the domain of application of auch and 	noch
3.3.2.	The meaning of auch and noch
3.3.3.	The syntax of auch and noch
3.3.4.	The intonation of auch- and noch-utterances
3.3.5.	Focus and the domain of application
Chapter 4 Results
4.1.	Quantitative results
4.1.1.	The distribution of auch and noch
4.1.2.	The domain of application
4.1.3.	The meaning of auch and noch
4.1.4.	The syntax of auch and noch
4.1.4.1.	The position within the utterance
4.1.4.2.	The position of auch and noch with respect to their 	domain
4.1.4.3.	The syntactic factors combined
4.1.4.4.	Summary
4.1.5.	The intonation of auch- and noch-utterances
4.1.5.1.	The location of the pitch accent
4.1.5.2.	The relation between position and accent location
4.1.5.3.	Summary
4.2.	Qualitative results
4.2.1.	The relation between the focus and the domain of 	application
4.2.1.1.	Auch
4.2.1.2.	Noch
4.2.1.3.	Noch mal and immer noch
4.2.1.4.	Summary
4.2.2.	Noch - the relation between its meanings and other 	properties
4.2.2.1.	The additive meanings of noch
4.2.2.2.	The temporal meanings of noch
4.2.2.3.	The comparative meaning of noch
4.2.2.4.	The repetitive meaning of noch
4.2.2.5.	The restitutive meaning of noch
4.2.2.6.	Summary
Chapter 5 Conclusions and discussion
5.1.	Usage patterns of auch and noch
5.2.	The importance of contextual information
5.3.	Intonation of auch- and noch-utterances
5.4.	The meaning of auch and noch
5.5.	The syntax of auch and noch
5.6.	The analysis of focus particles
Chapter 6 A fresh look at focus particles
6.1.	Previous attempts
6.2.	The analysis of AUCH
6.2.1.	The scope of AUCH
6.2.2.	The role of contrasts
6.2.3.	AUCH, modal particles and other sentential operators
6.3.	The analysis of auch
6.4.	Auch and noch and the new analysis
6.5.	Summary
Chapter 7 Child language - Aim, data and method
7.1.	Introduction
7.2.	The data
7.3.	Analysing child language
Chapter 8 Child language results
8.1.	Quantitative results
8.1.1.	The distribution of Auch and Noch
8.1.2.	The domain of application
8.1.3.	The meaning of Auch and Noch
8.1.4.	The syntax of Auch and Noch
8.1.4.1.	The position within the utterance
8.1.4.2.	The position of Auch and Noch with respect to 	their domain
8.1.4.3.	The syntactic factors combined
8.1.4.4.	Summary
8.1.5.	The intonation of Auch- and Noch-utterances
8.1.5.1.	The location of the pitch accent
8.1.5.2.	The relation between the particle syntax and the 	accent location
8.1.5.3.	Summary
8.2.	Qualitative results
8.2.1.	The relation between the focus and the domain of 	application
8.2.1.1.	Auch
8.2.1.2.	Noch
8.2.1.3.	Summary
8.2.2.	Noch - the relation between its different meanings 	and other properties
8.2.2.1.	The additive meanings of Noch
8.2.2.2.	The temporal meaning of Noch
8.2.2.3.	The comparative meaning of Noch
8.2.2.4.	The repetitive meaning of Noch
8.2.2.5.	Summary
Chapter 9 The acquisition of Auch and Noch
9.1.	A first comparison
9.2.	The Acquisition of Auch and Noch
9.2.1.	Previous research
9.2.1.1.	Crain, Philip, Drozd, Roeper and Matsuoka (1992) 	and Crain, Ni and Conway (1994) 
9.2.1.2.	Philip (2000) 
9.2.1.3.	Bergsma (1999) 
9.2.1.4.	Kail and Léveillé (1985)
9.2.1.5.	Lee (1995) 
9.2.1.6.	Penner, Tracy and Wymann (1999) and Penner, 	Tracy and Weissenborn (2000) 
9.2.1.7.	Summary
9.3.	Consequences for the acquisition of the two particles
9.4.	The development of Auch and Noch in child language
9.4.1.	The order of acquisition
9.4.2.	The role of the MLU
9.4.3.	The position within the utterance
9.4.3.1.	AUCH
9.4.3.2.	auch
9.4.3.3.	noch
9.4.3.4.	NOCH
9.5.	Summary
Chapter 10 General conclusions and discussion
10.1.	The empirical study of adult spoken German
10.2.	A new analysis of AUCH and auch
10.3.	The two particles in child language
10.4.	Learning to use Auch and Noch
10.5.	Future research
Appendices
Notes
Subject index
Author index




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