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Table of Contents of
The Papers of Thomas Jefferson
Volume 26

edited by
Julian P. Boyd


© 1950 - <2001> Princeton University Press

Reproduced 2003 with permission of the publisher

Table of Contents, All Volumes   |  Catalog record and links to related information from the Library of Congress catalog
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CONTENTS

May 11, 1793 to August 31, 1793
GUIDE TO EDITORIAL APPARATUS vii ILLUSTRATIONS xxxix JEFFERSON CHRONOLOGY 2
{ 1793 }
May June July August
INDEX ILLUSTRATIONS
May From Nathaniel Anderson, 11 May 3 From David M. Clarkson, 11 May 3 From Tench Coxe, [11 May] 4 To Samuel Freeman, 11 May 4 From Thomas Pinckney, 11 May 5 From Edward Stevens, 11 May 7 To John Wayles Eppes, 12 May 7 From Joseph Fenwick, 12 May 8 From Josef de Jaudenes and Josef Ignacio de Viar, 12 May 9 From Josef de Jaudenes and Josef Ignacio de Viar, 12 May 10 From Josef de Jaudenes and Josef Ignacio de Viar, 12 May 13 From Josef de Jaudenes and Josef Ignacio de Viar, 12 May 14 Note on the Public Debt, 12 May 17 To Martha Jefferson Randolph, 12 May, enclosing Adrien Petit's List of Packages Sent to Richmond, [ca. 12 May] 18 From James Currie, 13 May 21 From Robert Gamble, 13 May 21 From Alexander Hamilton, [13] May 22 Memorandum from Alexander Hamilton and Edmund Randolph, [ca. 13-15 May] 24 From Henry Lee, 13 May 25 To James Madison, [13 May] 25 To Sir John Temple, 13 May 27 From George Washington, 13 May 28 From George Washington, 13 May, enclosing Extracts from Arthur Young to George Washington, 17 January 28 Edmund Randolph's Opinion on the Grange, 14 May 31 From George Washington, with Jefferson's Note, 14 May 36 From George Washington, enclosing John Vaughan to George Washington, 14 May 37 From Tench Coxe, 15 May 37 To George Hammond, 15 May 38 To William Rawle, 15 May 40 From Peyton Short, 15 May 41 To Jean Baptiste Ternant, 15 May 42 From George Washington, with Jefferson's Note, 15 May 45 From Tench Coxe, 16 May 45 From Fenwick, Mason & Company, 16 May 45 From Edmond Charles Genet, 16 May, enclosing Letter of Credence from the Provisional Executive Council of France, 30 December 1792 46 From Henry Lee, 16 May 49 Opinion on the Restoration of Prizes, 16 May 50 From Martha Jefferson Randolph, 16 May 53 From Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 16 May 54 To George Washington, 16 May 55 From Brothers Coster & Company, 17 May 55 From Tench Coxe, 17 May 56 From Tench Coxe, 17 May 57 To George Washington, 18 May 57 To George Washington, 18 May 58 To Nathaniel Anderson, 19 May 58 To Mary Barclay, 19 May 58 To Robert Gamble, 19 May 59 To Edmond Charles Genet, 19 May 59 From David Humphreys, 19 May 60 To John Garland Jefferson, 19 May 60 To James Madison, 19 May 61 To John Mason, 19 May 63 From Robert Quarles, 19 May 63 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 19 May 64 From Tobias Lear, 20 May 66 From Thomas Sim Lee, 20 May 67 From Gouverneur Morris, 20 May 68 Notes on the Citoyen Genet and Its Prizes, 20 May 71 From E P. Van Berckel, 20 May 73 From Willink, Van Staphorst & Hubbard, 20 May 73 To Brothers Coster & Company, 21 May 74 To Henry Knox, with Proposed Circular to the Governors of the States, 21 May 75 To Henry Lee, 21 May 76 To William Vans Murray, 21 May 77 From Hans Rodolph Saabye, 21 May 77 To Josef Ignacio de Viar and Josef de Jaudenes, 21 May 78 From Robert Aitken, 22 May 79 From Edmond Charles Genet, 22 May 79 From Edmond Charles Genet, [22] May 81 From Edmond Charles Genet, 22 May 82 From Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 22 May 87 From James Simpson, 22 May 88 To Edward Telfair, 22 May 89 To Jean Baptiste Ternant, with Jefferson's Notes on Diplomatic Medals, 22 May 90 From F. P. Van Berckel, 22 May 91 To George Washington, 22 May 92 To James Brown, 23 May 92 From Stephen Cathalan, Jr., 23 May 93 From Tench Coxe, 23 May 94 From William Foushee, 23 May 95 From Edmond Charles Genet, 23 May 96 From Alexander Hamilton, 23 May 99 To Harry Innes, 23 May 99 From James Monroe, 23 May 101 Notes of a Conversation with George Washington, 23 May 101 From Joseph Ravara, 23 May 102 To Edmond Charles Genet, 24 May 105 To John Harvie, 24 May 105 Memorial from Benjamin Holland and Peter Mackie, 24 May 106 From Daniel L. Hylton, 24 May 107 To Jean Baptiste Le Roy, 24 May 108 To Gouverneur Morris, 24 May 108 From John Nicholas, Jr., [24-31] May 109 George Washington to the Provisional Executive Council of France, [24] May 110 From Stephen Cathalan, Jr., 25 May 112 From J. P. P. Derieux, 25 May 112 From C. W. E. Dumas, 25 May 113 From Jean Antoine Gautier, 25 May 114 From Grand & Cie., 25 May 114 From Grand & Cie., 25 May 116 From William Hylton, 25 May 117 To Thomas Sim Lee, 25 May 117 To Joseph Ravara, 25 May 118 From Josef Ignacio de Viar and Josef de Jaudenes, 25 May, enclosing Carondelet's Speech to the Cherokee Nation, 24 November 1792 118 From Nathaniel Anderson, 26 May 121 From Edmund Randolph, 26 May 121 To Martha Jefferson Randolph, 26 May 122 To Hugh Rose, 26 May 123 To George Wythe, [26 May] 124 From Edmond Charles Genet, 27 May 124 Memorial from Edmond Charles Genet, 27 May 130 To Benjamin Holland and Peter Mackie, 27 May 132 To James Madison, 27 May 132 From James Madison, 27 May 133 From Phineas Miller, 27 May 134 To George Washington, 27 May 134 From James Monroe, 28 May 135 Memorandum from Edmund Randolph [ca. 28-30 May] 137 Cabinet Opinion on the Creek Indians and Georgia, 29 May 138 From David Humphreys, 29 May 140 From James Madison, 29 May 141 From John Nixon, 29 May 142 To John Nixon, 29 May 142 From John Nixon, 29 May 143 To F. P. Van Berckel, 29 May 143 From William Vans Murray, 30 May 144 Edmund Randolph's Opinion on the Case of Gideon Henfield, 30 May 145 From Edmund Randolph, with Jefferson's Note, 30 May 146 To George Washington, 30 May 146 From James Biddle, 31 May 147 To William Carmichael and William Short, 31 May 148 From George Hammond, 31 May 150 From Tobias Lear, 31 May 151 From Edmund Randolph, with Jefferson's Note, 31 May 151 From Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 31 May 153 From Edward Stevens, 31 May 153 From Francis Walker, 31 May 153 To George Washington, 31 May 154 To George Washington, 31 May 154 To Edmond Charles Genet, [May?] 155 June Cabinet Memorandum on French Privateers, [1 June] 155 Cabinet Opinions on Sending an Agent to the Choctaw Indians, 1 June 156 To George Clinton, 1 June 157 To Edmond Charles Genet, 1 June 158 From Edmond Charles Genet, 1 June 159 To Edmond Charles Genet, 1 June 160 To Alexander Hamilton, 1 June 161 To Gouverneur Morris, 1 June 162 From Gouverneur Morris, 1 June 162 To William Short, 1 June 163 From James Simpson, 1 June 163 From Fulwar Skipwith, 1 June 164 From Edward Telfair, 1 June 165 From George Washington, 1 June 166 From Delamotte, 2 June 166 To James Madison, 2 June 167 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 2 June 169 From James Sullivan, 2 June 170 From James Brown, 3 June 170 From Matthew Clarkson, 3 June 172 From James Currie, 3 June 173 From Alexander Hamilton, 3 June 173 Jefferson and the American Debt to France 174 I. Thomas Jefferson to George Washington, 3 June 176 II. George Washington to Alexander Hamilton, 3 June 176 III. George Washington to Thomas Jefferson, [5 June] 177 IV. Alexander Hamilton's Draft Report on the American Debt to France, with Jefferson's Commentary, [5 June] 177 V. Thomas Jefferson to George Washington, 6 June 179 VI. Alexander Hamilton's Addition to His Draft Report, with Jefferson's Commentary, [6-7 June] 181 VII. Thomas Jefferson to George Washington, [7 June] 182 VIII. Alexander Hamilton's Report on the American Debt to France, 8 June 183 IX. George Washington to Thomas Jefferson, 10 June 184 From James Maury, 3 June 185 From John Nixon, 3 June 185 From David Rittenhouse, 3 June 185 To George Washington, 3 June 186 To Nathaniel Anderson, 4 June 187 To James Currie, 4 June 187 To Charles Lilburne Lewis, 4 June 188 From Adam Lindsay, 4 June 189 To James Monroe, 4 June 189 To John Nixon, 4 June 191 To Thomas Pinckney, 4 June 191 To George Washington, 4 June 192 From George Washington, 4 June 193 To George Washington, 4 June 193 From George Washington, 4 June, enclosing Alexander Hamilton to George Washington, 3 June 193 From Robert Gamble, 5 June 194 To Edmond Charles Genet, 5 June 195 To George Hammond, 5 June 197 From George Hammond, 5 June 199 Opinion on a New Foreign Loan, 5 June 201 To Josef Ignacio de Viar and Josef de Jaudenes, 5 June 205 To George Washington, 5 June 206 From William Carmichael and William Short, 6 June 206 To Edmond Charles Genet, 6 June 213 From George Gilmer, 6 June 213 From John Garland Jefferson, 6 June 213 From Hans Rodolph Saabye, 6 June 214 To Angelica Schuyler Church, 7 June 215 Memorial from George Hammond, enclosing List of British Vessels Captured by French Privateers on the American Coast, 7 June 216 From Henry Lee, 7 June 218 Notes on Conversations with John Beckley and George Washington, 7 June 219 From Benjamin H. Phillips, 7 June 221 From William Short, 7 June 222 From John Matthew Bulkeley, 8 June 228 From Nathaniel Cutting, 8 June 229 From Robert W. Fox, 8 June 231 From Edmond Charles Genet, 8 June 231 From William Lambert, 8 June 234 To John Nicholas, Jr., 8 June 235 To Robert Quarles, 8 June 235 To James Sullivan, 8 June 236 From William Thornton, enclosing Designs for Maces, 8 June 236 To George Washington, 8 June 238 To James Brown, 9 June 239 To James Madison, 9 June 239 From James Currie, 10 June 242 From Alexander Hamilton, 10 June 243 To Adam Lindsay, 10 June 247 From John Nixon, 10 June 248 Notes on Ceremonial at New York, 10 June 248 From Thomas Pinckney, 10 June 249 To Martha Jefferson Randolph, 10 June 250 From Elias Vanderhorst, 10 June 250 To Edmond Charles Genet, 11 June 252 Memorial from George Hammond, 11 June 253 To William Jackson, 11 June 254 From John Loehmann, 11 June 255 To John Nixon, 11 June 256 To William Stokes, 11 June 256 To William Thornton, 11 June 256 From George Washington, 11 June 257 To George Washington, 11 June 258 From George Washington, 11 June 258 From Thomas Bell, 12 June 258 Cabinet Opinions on the Republican and the Catharine, 12 June 259 From George Hammond, [12 June] 261 To Richard Harison, 12 June 261 From Josef de Jaudenes and Josef Ignacio de Viar, 12 June, enclosing Patent Issued by William Blount, 10 August 1792, and Relation of Ugulayacabe, [after November 1792] 263 From Gouverneur Morris, 12 June 266 Notes on Alexander Hamilton and "Veritas," 12 June 267 To George Washington, 12 June 268 From George Washington, with Jefferson's Note, 12 June 268 To George Washington, 12 June 269 George Washington to the Secretaries of State, Treasury, and War, [12 June] 269 To George Washington, 12 June 270 To George Hammond, 13 June 270 From Josef de Jaudenes, [13 June] 271 From James Madison, 13 June 272 To Gouverneur Morris, 13 June 274 To Gouverneur Morris, 13 June 277 From Samuel A. Otis, 13 June 277 From Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 13 June 278 From William Stokes, 13 June 279 From George Washington, 13 June 280 From George Washington, 13 June 280 From David M. Clarkson, 14 June 280 From Edmond Charles Genet, 14 June 281 From Edmond Charles Genet, 14 June 283 From George Hammond, 14 June 284 From Richard Harrison, 14 June 286 To Thomas Pinckney, 14 June 286 From Thomas Pinckney, 14 June 288 From John Clarke, 15 June 289 From Edmond Charles Genet, 15 June 290 From John Tayloe Griffin, 16 June 292 From George Washington, 16 June, enclosing Alexander Hamilton's Report on a New Foreign Loan, 15 June 293 From Sylvanus Bourne, 17 June 296 Cabinet Opinion on French Privateers, 17 June 296 To Edmond Charles Genet, 17 June 297 To Edmond Charles Genet, 17 June 301 From James Madison, 17 June 302 Second Opinion on a New Foreign Loan, 17 June 303 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 17 June 307 From Hilary Baker, 18 June 308 Agreement with Samuel Biddle, 18 June 308 From Edmond Charles Genet, 18 June, enclosing Notice to the Citizens of the United States, 17 June 308 To John Tayloe Griffin, 18 June 312 From Josef de Jaudenes and Josef Ignacio de Viar, 18 June, enclosing Cherokee Nation to Baron de Carondelet, 5 April 313 Notice for Rental of Mill Seat, 18 June 317 To John Spurrier, 18 June 318 From Etienne Claviere, 19 June 318 From Bartholomew Dandridge, Jr., 19 June 319 To Edmond Charles Genet, 19 June 320 To Alexander Hamilton and Henry Knox, with their Approvals, 19 June 321 To George Hammond, 19 June 321 To George Hammond, 19 June 322 From George Hammond, 19 June 322 To William Hylton, 19 June 323 From James Madison, 19 June 323 From Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 19 June 325 Report on the Proceedings of the Southwest Territory, 19 June 326 To George Washington, 19 June 327 To George Washington, 19 June 327 Cabinet Opinion on Relations with Spain and Great Britain, 20 June 328 From George Hammond, 20 June 329 From Richard Harison, 20 June 330 From David Humphreys, 20 June 331 From Thomas Pinckney, 20 June 332 From George Washington, 20 June 333 Petition from Eli Whitney, 20 June 334 Memorial from George Hammond, 21 June 335 Petition and Memorial from Peter Lemaigre, 21 [June] 336 From Edmond Charles Genet, 22 June 339 To Henry Knox, 22 June 342 George Washington to the Commissioners of Accounts for the States, [22 June] 343 To Edmond Charles Genet, 23 June 344 To Edmond Charles Genet, 23 June 344 To La Forest, 23 June 345 To James Madison, 23 June 346 From William Short, 23 June 346 From George Washington, 23 June 353 Petition from Abijah Babcock, 24 June 353 From Tench Coxe, [24 June] 354 From Grand & Cie., 24 June 354 From Alexander Hamilton, 24 June 355 To Samuel A. Otis, 24 June 355 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 24 June 355 To Paul Bentalou, 25 June 357 From the Commissioners of the Federal District, 25 June 357 To Edmond Charles Genet, 25 June 358 From Edmond Charles Genet, enclosing Extracts from French Consular Reports, with Genet's Observations, 25 [June] 359 To Alexander Hamilton and Henry Knox, with their Replies, 25 June 361 To George Hammond, 25 June 361 To George Hammond, 25 June 362 To Zebulon Hollingsworth, 25 June 363 From Gouverneur Morris, 25 June 363 From Jedidiah Morse, 25 June 369 Memorial from Nicholas Cruger and Others, 26 June 369 From Edmond Charles Genet, 26 June 374 To George Hammond, 26 June 375 To George Hammond, 26 June 378 Memorial from George Hammond, 26 June 378 To Thomas Pinckney, 26 June 379 From Martha Jefferson Randolph, 26 June 380 To William Rawle, 26 June 381 From George Hammond, [27 June] 381 From James Monroe, 27 June 381 To Francis Walker, 27 June 385 To Thomas Bell, 28 June 386 To Clement Biddle, 28 June 386 To John Clarke, 28 June 387 From Joseph Fenwick, 28 June 387 To George Gilmer, 28 June 389 To Thomas Greenleaf, 28 [June] 390 To John Hancock, 28 June 390 To Henry Lee, 28 June 391 From Henry Lee, 28 June 391 To James Monroe, 28 June 392 To Isaac Shelby, 28 June 393 To George Washington, 28 June 396 To Phineas Bond, 29 June 398 To Edmond Charles Genet, 29 June 398 To Edmond Charles Genet, 29 June 399 From Edmond Charles Genet, 29 June 400 To James Madison, 29 June 401 From James Madison, 29 June 404 From James Simpson, 29 June 405 To William Carmichael and William Short, 30 June 405 To Edmond Charles Genet, 30 June 417 From William Lyall and Others, 30 June 418 From Michael Morphy, 30 June 420 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 30 June 422 From George Washington, 30 June 424 From George Washington, 30 June 425 July From David Humphreys, 1 July 427 To George Logan, 1 July 428 From William Short, 1 July 428 From Willink, Van Staphorst & Hubbard, 1 July 430 From Richard Soderstrom, [3 July] 432 From George Washington, 3 July 433 From James Maury, 4 July 433 From John M. Pintard, 4 July 434 From James Simpson, 4 July 434 From Elias Vanderhorst, 4 July 435 From George Washington, 4 July 436 From Alexander Hamilton, 5 July 437 Notes of Cabinet Meeting and Conversations with Edmond Charles Genet, 5 July 437 From Thomas Pinckney, 5 July 439 From Benjamin Peirce, 6 July 442 From J. Wheatcroft, 6 July 443 To James Madison, 7 July 443 From Thomas Mifflin, 7 July, enclosing Nathaniel Falconer to Thomas Mifflin, 6 July 444 To Martha Jefferson Randolph, 7 July 445 Cabinet Opinions on the Little Sarah, 8 July 446 Dissenting Opinion on the Little Sarah, 8 July 449 From Edmond Charles Genet, 8 July 452 From Lucas Gibbes and Alexander S. Glass, 8 July 453 From Thomas Pinckney, 8 July 454 To William Thornton, 8 July 455 From James Wood, 8 July 455 From Edmond Charles Genet, 9 July 456 From Edmond Charles Genet, 9 July 457 From Edmond Charles Genet, 9 July 458 From Henry Cooper, 10 July 460 From Alexander Hamilton, 10 July 460 Memorial from George Hammond, 10 July 461 James Hoban's Observations on William Thornton's Design for the Capitol, 10 July 462 From Robert Leslie, 10 July 463 Memorandum of a Conversation with Edmond Charles Genet, 10 July 463 From Alexander J. Dallas, 11 July 467 To Edmond Charles Genet, 11 July 468 Memorandum from Stephen Hallet, 11 July 468 From George Hammond, 11 July 469 From Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 11 July 470 To William Short, 11 July 472 To Josef Ignacio de Viar and Josef de Jaudenes, 11 July 473 To Josef Ignacio de Viar and Josef de Jaudenes, 11 July 474 From Josef Ignacio de Viar and Josef de Jaudenes, 11 July 474 Memorandum to George Washington, enclosing Papers on Spain Received from Edmond Charles Genet, [11 July] 476 Memorandum to George Washington, [11 July] 479 Memorandum to George Washington, [11-13 July] 480 From George Washington, 11 July 481 To George Washington, [11 July] 482 To James Blake, 12 July 483 Passport for James Blake, 12 July 484 Cabinet Opinion on Consulting the Supreme Court, 12 July 484 To William Carmichael and William Short, 12 July 485 To Edmond Charles Genet, 12 July 486 To Edmond Charles Genet and George Hammond, 12 July 487 Circular to the Justices of the Supreme Court, 12 July 488 To William Short, [ca. 12 July] 488 From William Thornton, [ca. 12 July] 489 From Josef Ignacio de Viar and Josef de Jaudenes, 12 July 495 To George Washington, 12 July 495 From Gaetano Drago di Domenico, 13 July 496 From George Hammond, 13 July 496 From Josef de Jaudenes and Josef Ignacio de Viar, 13 July 497 Notes on Neutrality Questions, 13 July 498 To Thomas Carstairs, 14 July 500 To James Madison, 14 July 500 To James Monroe, 14 July 501 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 14 July 503 To Josef Ignacio de Viar and Josef de Jaudenes, 14 July 505 From Tobias Lear, 15 July 506 To George Nicholas, 15 July 507 Notes of a Cabinet Meeting, 15 July 508 To George Washington, 15 July 509 To William Carmichael, 16 July 510 To William Carmichael and William Short, 16 July 510 To Edmond Charles Genet, [ca. 16 July] 510 To George Washington, 16 July 514 From John Clarke, 17 July 515 From Tench Coxe, 17 July 516 To Henry Lee, 17 July 516 To Stephen Sayre, 17 July 517 To George Washington, 17 July 517 To James Wood, 17 July 520 To the Justices of the Supreme Court, 18 July 520 From James Madison, 18 July 521 Notes on James Cole Mountflorence and on Federalist Intrigues, 18 July 522 The Referral of Neutrality Questions to the Supreme Court 524 I. Alexander Hamilton's Questions for the Supreme Court, [ca. 18 July] 527 II. Thomas Jefferson's Questions for the Supreme Court, [ca. 18 July] 530 III. Henry Knox's Questions for the Supreme Court, [ca. 18 July] 532 IV. Questions for the Supreme Court, [18 July] 534 V. Thomas Jefferson to George Washington, 18 July 537 From George Washington, 18 July 537 From John Clarke, 19 July 538 From J. P. P. Derieux, 19 July 538 From George Hough, 19 July 539 From John Parish, 19 July 539 From Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 19 July 540 To George Washington, 19 July 541 From David Humphreys, 20 July 541 From the Justices of the Supreme Court, enclosing the Justices of the Supreme Court to George Washington, 20 July 543 From George Washington, 20 July 544 From Francis Eppes, 21 July 544 To James Madison, 21 July 545 Note on Edmond Charles Genet and Alexander Hamilton, 21 July 545 To Martha Jefferson Randolph, 21 July 546 To John Vaughan, 21 July 546 From Benjamin Bourne, 22 July 546 Memorial from George Hammond, 22 July 547 From James Madison, 22 July 548 To George Washington, 22 July 550 George Washington to the Justices of the Supreme Court, [22 July] 550 From George Washington, 22 July 550 From Tench Coxe, 23 July 551 To Edmond Charles Genet, 23 July 551 From James Monroe, 23 July 551 Notes of Cabinet Meeting on Edmond Charles Genet, 23 July 553 From John M. Pintard, 23 July 556 To Edmund Randolph, with Jefferson's Note, [23 July] 557 To Edmond Charles Genet, 24 July 557 From Richard Harison, 24 July 560 From Edmund Randolph, [ca. 24 July] 561 From Josef Ignacio de Viar and Josef de Jaudenes, [24 July] 562 From Tench Coxe, 25 July 563 From Edmond Charles Genet, 25 July 563 From Parry Hall, 25 July 566 Petition and Remonstrance from Peter Lemaigre, 25 July 566 From Edmund Randolph, 25 July 568 To George Washington, 25 July 568 From George Washington, 25 July 569 To John Bringhurst, 26 July 569 To Edward Dowse, 26 July 570 From Alexander Hamilton, 26 July 571 Memorandum of Conversations with Edmond Charles Genet, 26 July 571 From Van Staphorst & Hubbard, 26 July 573 From George Washington, 26 July 574 To Delamotte, 27 July 574 To James Madison, 28 July 575 To James Madison, 28 July 575 From Benjamin H. Phillips, 28 July 575 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 28 July 576 From George Washington, 28 July 578 From Bartholomew Dandridge, Jr., 29 July 578 Notes of Cabinet Meeting on Neutrality, 29 July 579 Notes on Treaties and Neutrality, [29-30 July] 581 From Henry Remsen, 29 July 582 George Washington to the Cabinet, 29 July 582 From Enoch Edwards, 30 July 583 Memorial from George Hammond, 30 July 584 From James Madison, 30 July 585 From Michael Morphy, 30 July 587 Notes of Cabinet Meeting on Neutrality, 30 July 588 From Edward Church, 31 July 589 From Tench Coxe, with Jefferson's Note, 31 July 589 From Tench Coxe, 31 July 590 From Jean B. Desdoity, 31 July 590 From Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 31 July 591 To George Washington, 31 July 593 To George Washington, 31 July 594 From George Washington, 31 July 594 From Fulwar Skipwith, July 595 August From Samuel Biddle, 1 August 596 To George Hammond, 1 August 596 From John Harriott, 1 August 597 Notes of Cabinet Meeting on Edmond Charles Genet, 1 August 598 From Thomas Pinckney, 1 August 598 From Henry Remsen, 1 August 599 From Phineas Bond, 2 August 600 From Joseph Fenwick, 2 August 601 Notes of Cabinet Meeting on Edmond Charles Genet, 2 August 601 Cabinet Opinion on Prizes and Privateers, 3 August 603 From Enoch Edwards, 3 August 605 To James Madison, 3 August 606 Notes of Cabinet Meeting on Neutrality, 3 August 607 Rules on Neutrality, 3 August 608 George Washington to the Cabinet, 3 August 611 To Edmond Charles Genet, 4 August 611 From Edmond Charles Genet, 4 August 612 To George Hammond, 4 August 612 From David Humphreys, 4 August 613 Opinion on Convening Congress, 4 August 615 From Edmund Randolph, 4 August 616 To Martha Jefferson Randolph, enclosing Recipes of Adrien Petit, 4 August 617 To Sir John Temple, 4 August 618 From George Washington, 4 August 618 To George Washington, 4 August 619 Cabinet Opinions on Privateers and Prizes, 5 August 620 To Jean B. Desdoity, 5 August 622 To John Harriott, 5 August 622 From James Madison, 5 August 623 To Edmund Randolph, 5 August 624 From Abraham Runnels & Son, 5 August 624 From Vanuxem & Lombairt, 5 August 626 Notes of Cabinet Decisions, 6 August 627 Notes of a Conversation with George Washington, 6 August 627 From Sir John Temple, 6 August 630 From Clement Biddle, 7 August 630 To Nicholas Collin, 7 August 631 Petition and Memorial from Lewis Crousillat, 7 August 631 To Edmond Charles Genet, 7 August 633 To George Hammond, 7 August 634 From Gouverneur Morris, 7 August 635 To Benjamin Rush, 7 August 638 To George Washington, 7 August 639 To George Washington, 7 August 639 To George Hammond, 8 August 639 From George Hammond, 8 August 640 To George Hammond, 8 August 641 From Andrew Porter, 8 August 641 To George Washington, 8 August 642 From George Washington, 8 August 642 To Clement Biddle, 9 August 642 From George Hammond, 9 August 642 From Arthur St. Clair, 9 August 643 From James Simpson, 9 August 644 To Vanuxem & Lombairt, 9 August 645 From Robert Clinton, 10 August 645 From Robert W. Fox, 10 August 646 From Willink, Van Staphorst & Hubbard, 10 August 647 From James Wood, 10 August 648 To Henry Knox, 11 August 648 To James Madison, 11 August 649 To James Madison, 11 August 651 From James Madison, 11 August 654 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 11 August 657 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 11 August 659 To John Cleves Symmes, 11 August 659 To George Washington, 11 August 659 From Tobias Lear, 12 August 660 From George Washington, 12 August 660 From Archibald Campbell, 13 August 661 From Alexander Hamilton, 13 August 661 From Gouverneur Morris, 13 August 662 From Edmund Randolph, [ca. 13 August] 665 To Edmund Randolph, [ca. 13 August] 665 To George Washington, 13 August 666 From Tobias Lear, 14 August 666 From Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 14 August 667 From George Washington, 14 August 668 From William Carmichael and William Short, 15 August 668 To the Commissioners of the Federal District, enclosing Thomas Carstairs's Estimate of the Cost of Masonry for the Capitol, 15 August 671 From David Humphreys, 15 August 673 From Thomas Pinckney, 15 August 673 From David Meade Randolph, 15 August 675 To George Washington, 15 August 676 From George Washington, with Jefferson's Note, 15 August, enclosing Edmond Charles Genet to George Washington, 13 August 676 From Willink, Van Staphorst & Hubbard, 15 August 679 From Enoch Edwards, 16 August, enclosing Sir John Sinclair to Enoch Edwards, 13 August 679 To Edmond Charles Genet, 16 August 684 The Recall of Edmond Charles Genet 685 I. Alexander Hamilton's Outline for the Letter of Recall, [ca. 2 August] 693 II. Proposed Addition to the Letter of Recall, [ca. 15-20 August] 694 III. Analysis of the Letter of Recall, [ca. 15-20 August] 696 IV. Thomas Jefferson to Gouverneur Morris, 16 August 697 From Joseph Barnes, 17 August 715 From Joseph Barnes, 17 August 716 From Pierce Butler, [17 August] 717 George Wythe to Thomas Jefferson and Edmund Randolph, 17 August 717 To Archibald Campbell, 18 August 718 To J. P. P. Derieux, 18 August 719 To Robert Gamble, 18 August 719 To James Madison, 18 August 720 To Martha Jefferson Randolph, 18 August 721 To George Washington, [ca. 18-19 August] 722 From Angelica Schuyler Church, 19 August, enclosing Lafayette to the Princesse d'Henin, 15 March 722 From George Hammond, 19 August 724 From Richard Soderstrom, 19 August 726 From George Washington, 19 August 727 From Zebulon Hollingsworth, 20 August 728 From James Madison, 20 August 729 Notes of Cabinet Meeting on Edmond Charles Genet, 20 August 730 From William Short, 20 August 732 To Richard Soderstrom, 20 August 733 From George Buchanan, 21 August 733 From Tobias Lear, 21 August 734 From James Monroe, 21 August 735 From Edward Telfair, 21 August 736 To George Washington, 21 August 737 To Delamotte, 22 August 737 To Alexander Donald, 22 August 738 To Joseph Fenwick, 22 August 739 To Henry Knox, 22 August 739 To Henry Knox, 22 August 740 To James McHenry, Robert Gilmor, and Samuel Sterett, 22 August 740 From James Madison, [22 August] 741 To Thomas Pinckney, 22 August 742 To Thomas Pinckney, 22 August 742 To George Washington, 22 August 743 From James Anderson, 23 August 743 To Benjamin Smith Barton, 23 August 744 From Phineas Bond, 23 August 744 Cabinet Opinions on Edmond Charles Genet, 23 August 745 From Robert Gamble, 23 August 746 To Gouverneur Morris, [23] August 747 Notes of Cabinet Meeting on a Commercial Treaty with France, 23 August 749 From James Simpson, 23 August 751 From George Washington, 23 August 751 To the Cabinet, 24 August 752 To George Hammond, 24 August 752 From Joshua Johnson, 24 August 752 To George Washington, 24 August 754 From George Washington, with Jefferson's Note, 24 August 754 From George Washington, 24 August 754 From David Humphreys, 25 August 755 To James Madison, 25 August 756 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 25 August 757 From James Simpson, 25 August 757 From Joseph Yznardi, Jr., 25 August 758 To William Channing, 26 August 758 To Delamotte, 26 August 759 From Alexander Hamilton, 26 August 759 To James McHenry, 26 August 759 To Gouverneur Morris, 26 August 760 To Thomas Pinckney, 26 August 761 To Thayer, Bartlet & Company, 26 August 762 To George Washington, 26 August 762 To George Washington, 26 August 763 To Benjamin Smith Barton, 27 August 763 From Tench Coxe, 27 August, enclosing Unknown to Tench Coxe or Daniel W. Coxe?, 7 June 763 To George Hammond, 27 August 765 From Adam Lindsay, 27 August 765 From James Madison, 27 August 766 Circular to American Merchants, 27 August 767 From James Cole Mountflorence, 27 August 769 From Thomas Pinckney, 27 August 770 From Josef Ignacio de Viar and Josef de Jaudenes, 27 August, enclosing Edmond Charles Genet's Address to Louisiana 771 From James B. M. Adair, [ca. 28 August] 775 From Thomas Pinckney, 28 August, enclosing Thomas Digges to Pinckney, 13 August, and Digges's Memorandums on Counterfeiting, 12 August 776 To Edmund Randolph, 28 August 782 From Delamotte, 29 August 783 From Edward Dowse, 29 August 783 From Robert Gilmor and Samuel Sterett, 29 August 784 From Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 29 August 784 To Isaac Shelby, 29 August 785 To Josef Ignacio de Viar and Josef de Jaudenes, 29 August 786 From Samuel Ward, with Jefferson's Note, 29 August 786 From James Wood, 29 August 787 To Samuel Biddle, 30 August 788 To George Buchanan, 30 August 788 From J. P. P. Derieux, 30 August 788 To Richard Dobson, 30 August 789 From George Hammond, enclosing List of French Privateers Outfitted and Armed in the United States, 30 August 789 To Montgomery & Henry, 30 August 791 From John Nixon, 30 August 792 From Abraham Runnels & Son, 30 August 792 To George Washington, 30 August 795 From George Washington, 30 August 795 Cabinet Opinions on the Roland and Relations with Great Britain, France, and the Creeks, 31 August 795 From Dennis Griffith, 31 August 798 From Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 31 August 799 To John Suter, 31 August 800 INDEX 801
ILLUSTRATIONS
Following page 340
EDMOND CHARLES GENET (1763-1834) Jefferson initially welcomed Genet's arrival in Philadelphia in May 1793 as the harbinger of closer relations between the sister republics of France and the United States. But, much to Jefferson's dismay, the French Republic's first minister to the United States soon provoked the gravest crisis the Virginia statesman ever faced as Secretary of State. Adhering unswervingly to instruc- tions from his Girondin superiors which called for a high level of American support for the French war effort against the allied coalition, the headstrong Genet insisted that France was entitled to commission privateers in American ports, enlist American citizens in French service, and exercise exclusive consu- lar admiralty jurisdiction over French prizes. Despite the Washington admini- stration's condemnation of these practices as violations of American neutrality, Genet persisted in them and sought to mobilize popular support for greater American assistance to France by aligning himself with the Republican opposi- tion and by claiming a right to appeal from the President to Congress and to the American people. The resulting conflict between the French minister and the Washington administration led in August 1793 to an official American request for Genet's recall. Engraving by Gilles Louis Chretien, 1793. (Courtesy of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation) GEORGE WASHINGTON (1732-99) During the early stages of the Cabinet debates over the recall of Edmond Charles Genet, the President and the Secretary of State found themselves at odds with each other. Like Jefferson, Washington believed that the United States could best serve itself and the French cause as a neutral supplier of provi- sions to the French Republic and its West Indian colonies, and therefore he feared that Genet's efforts to bend American neutrality in a pro-French direc- tion might provoke British retaliation. Unlike Jefferson, however, Washington resented Genet's alignment with the Republican party because he was appre- hensive that the French minister would take advantage of the widespread popu- lar support the French Revolution enjoyed in the United States to pave the way for the accession to power of what he perceived to be a factious opposition whose policies would be ruinous to the new American nation. Initially Washington favored a proposal by Alexander Hamilton to discredit the enthusiastically pro- Genet Republican opposition by accompanying the federal government's re- quest for Genet's recall with a public statement to the American people explain- ing the full magnitude of the French minister's defiance of the President and his neutrality policy. However, Washington turned against Hamilton's initiative in part because of Jefferson's warning that the proposed statement would make the President himself appear to be a mere partisan leader. Portrait by Charles Willson Peale, 1795. (Courtesy of the New-York Histori- cal Society) ALEXANDER HAMILTON (ca. 1755-1804) Edmond Charles Genet's opposition to American neutrality predictably led to Hamilton's emergence as the leading proponent of the French minister's re- call. The Secretary of the Treasury abhorred the radicalization of the French Revolution attendant upon the overthrow of the Bourbon monarchy and the establishment of the French Republic as a sustained exercise in political anarchy and wanted the United States to enter into closer relations with Great Britain. He also feared that Genet's repeated defiance of American neutrality would eventually involve the United States in hostilities with Great Britain that would endanger the whole edifice of Hamiltonian finance. Indeed, Hamilton was con- vinced that Genet's criticisms of American neutrality and alignment with the Republican opposition were parts of a deliberate revolutionary strategy de- signed to make the United States an active participant in the French war effort while subverting popular confidence in the Washington administration. By alerting the American public to the full extent of Genet's resistance to American neutrality and disrespect for the President, Hamilton was confident that Feder- alists could rally popular support for themselves as defenders of American sov- ereignty, discredit Republicans as tools of a foreign power inimical to American interests, and undermine American support for the French cause. Consequently Hamilton became the strongest advocate in the Cabinet of Genet's recall. Portrait by Charles Willson Peale, ca. 1791. (Courtesy of Independence Na- tional Historical Park) HENRY KNOX (1750-1806) This Massachusetts Federalist leader was the strongest supporter in the Cab- inet of Hamilton's call for Edmond Charles Genet's recall. Knox shared the same concerns as Hamilton about Genet's resistance to American neutrality and was even more extreme than the Treasury Secretary about the proper response to the French minister's defiant behavior. In addition to supporting Genet's recall and the immediate release of an explanatory statement to the American people, the Secretary of War also argued unsuccessfully that Genet either be expelled from the United States or forced to suspend his mission while the request for his recall was still pending. During the Cabinet debates over Genet's recall, Jefferson was particularly annoyed by Knox's habit of citing extreme Republican criticisms of the President in order to underscore for Washington the danger of the French minister's alignment with Republican opponents of the Washington administration. In fact, Jefferson was so contemptuous of Knox's unwavering support of Hamilton in the Cabinet that on more than one occasion he denounced Knox as a fool in private memorandums that later became part of the "Anas." Posthumous portrait by Gilbert Stuart, 1810. (Courtesy of the Museum of Fine Arts) EDMUND RANDOLPH (1753-1813) Despite frequent oscillations between Hamiltonian and Jeffersonian posi- tions in the Cabinet that infuriated the Secretary of State, Randolph provided critical support for Jefferson during the debates over Edmond Charles Genet's recall. Like Washington and Jefferson, Randolph valued the French alliance as a cornerstone of American diplomacy. He was especially sensitive to the politi- cal implications of the overwhelming popular support the French Revolution enjoyed in the United States but apprehensive about the "ardour of some, to transplant French politics, as fresh fuel for our own parties" (Opinion of Ran- dolph, 6 May 1793, DLC: Washington Papers). In order to preserve the confi- dence of the American people, Randolph believed that the federal government had to avoid even the appearance of hostility to France. Therefore he supported Jefferson's effort to bring about Genet's recall in a way that was least offensive to the French Republic and its American supporters. Since the President relied increasingly on the Attorney General as a moderate voice in the Cabinet, Ran- dolph was able to raise doubts in Washington's mind about the wisdom of Alex- ander Hamilton's proposed statement to the American people about the Genet affair. Copy by Flavius J. Fisher of a missing portrait by an unidentified artist. (Courtesy of the Virginia State Library) EDMOND CHARLES GENET TO THOMAS JEFFERSON Replete with extensive revisions characteristic of Genet's drafts, this is the first page of a 23 May 1793 letter to Jefferson in which the French minister sought to begin negotiations for a far-reaching commercial treaty that, unbe- knownst to the Secretary of State, would have made the United States a virtual partner in the French war effort against the allied coalition. Although Jefferson did not learn the full dimensions of the proposed treaty until Genet published a modified text of his instructions from the French government in December 1793, he favored entering into negotiations with the French minister in order to achieve his longstanding goal of strengthening the economic ties between France and the United States in order to end what he regarded as America's economic vassalage to Great Britain. But he was overruled by President Wash- ington and his colleagues in the Cabinet, who opposed a new commercial treaty with France because they were satisfied with the extensive commercial conces- sions that the European war had already forced France to make to the United States, concerned that the French Republic might not survive internal opposi- tion and the allied onslaught, and apprehensive that the new political links with France Genet alluded to in this letter might fatally compromise American neu- trality. Jefferson was consequently obliged to resort to the polite diplomatic fiction of notifying Genet in conversation that the Senate's constitutional share of the treaty-making power made it advisable for him to delay any negotiations for a new commercial treaty until that body reconvened as scheduled later in 1793. By then, however, the Washington administration was awaiting the French response to its request for Genet's recall, and Jefferson was never able to achieve the treaty by which he had hoped to bring about a fundamental reor- dering of the political economy of the new American nation. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress) GEORGE WASHINGTON TO THE PROVISIONAL EXECUTIVE COUNCIL OF FRANCE The drafting of this letter, which was finally dated 24 May 1793, revealed important differences in the attitudes of Jefferson and the President toward the cause of the embattled French Republic. Washington asked Jefferson to draft a letter in his name to the Provisional Executive Council expressing the Presi- dent's sentiments on the occasion of the termination of the diplomatic mission of Jean Baptiste Ternant, Louis XVI's last minister to the United States. During a private meeting on 23 May 1793 Washington objected to Jefferson's use of the phrase "our republic" with respect to the United States because it seemed to be too redolent of Republican complaints about the alleged monarchism of Feder- alists and expressed reservations about Jefferson's use of the term "republic" in regard to France because the rapidly shifting situation in that country left the survival of the French Republic open to doubt. In accordance with the Presi- dent's wishes, Jefferson deleted the offending words, so that the final text of the letter reflected Washington's wish to avoid too close a linkage between the American and French republics. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress) THOMAS JEFFERSON TO ISAAC SHELBY Written at the behest of Edmond Charles Genet, Jefferson's letter of 28 June 1793 to the governor of Kentucky introducing the distinguished French bota- nist Andre Michaux was a deliberately ambiguous response to a diplomatic dilemma. On the one hand, Jefferson's belief that Spanish intrigues with the Southern Indians threatened to provoke a war between Spain and the United States predisposed him to favor a Girondin-inspired plan by the French minis- ter to liberate Louisiana from Spanish rule with an expeditionary force raised in part in Kentucky with the help of Michaux, who had already agreed to embark on a search for an all-water route to the Pacific under the aegis of the American Philosophical Society. On the other hand, Genet's increasing defiance of key elements of the Washington administration's neutrality policy inclined Jeffer- son to distance himself from the French minister as much as possible. Under the impact of these conflicting imperatives, Jefferson carefully revised the draft so as to encourage Shelby to assist Michaux's efforts without directly committing himself as Secretary of State to Genet's proposed expedition against Louisiana. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress) EDMOND CHARLES GENET'S ADDRESS TO THE FRENCH PEOPLE OF LOUISIANA In this pamphlet Genet called upon French settlers in Louisiana to rise up against Spanish rule and support a combined French and American land and naval expedition that was designed to create an independent Louisiana with close ties to France and the United States. Genet read this address to Jefferson during a meeting on 5 July 1793, emphasizing that he was doing so unofficially, and Jefferson refrained from informing the President or the Cabinet about it. Late in August 1793, however, Josef Ignacio de Viar and Josef de Jaudenes, the Spanish government's agents in Philadelphia, procured a copy of the pam- phlet and sent it to Jefferson with a request that the Washington administration take steps to prevent any American participation in the projected assault on Louisiana. Jefferson duly submitted the Spanish agents' letter and its enclosure to Washington, without revealing his prior knowledge of Genet's address, and then instructed Governor Isaac Shelby of Kentucky in accordance with their wishes. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress) THOMAS JEFFERSON TO GOUVERNEUR MORRIS Jefferson's 16 Aug. 1793 letter to the American minister in Paris set forth the rationale for the Washington administration's request for Edmond Charles Genet's recall. Jefferson's Cabinet colleagues advised him to emphasize Genet's challenge to American neutrality and his disrespect for constituted authority in the United States, and Hamilton also urged him to stress Genet's involvement in domestic politics as evidence of a calculated French design to subvert popular confidence in the Washington administration. Eager to avoid a diplomatic crisis with France, to comply with the President's preference for a statement that distinguished between the French nation and its minister, and to counteract Hamilton's efforts to associate Genet with the Republican party, Jefferson pro- duced a masterful letter which defended American neutrality policy, arraigned Genet for repeatedly defying it, and absolved France of any responsibility for the French minister's actions, attributing them instead to Genet's personal willful- ness. In this way Jefferson offered France a graceful way out of a difficult diplo- matic situation, but at the unexpected cost of convincing the new Jacobin gov- ernment in Paris that Genet was a key actor in an alleged Girondin plot against French republican liberty and unity. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress) "A PEEP INTO THE ANTIFEDERAL CLUB" Drawn by an anonymous American artist in New York City on 16 Aug. 1793, a few days after Edmond Charles Genet began a prolonged stay there in connection with his ultimately fruitless efforts to mount French expeditions against Canada and Louisiana, and offered for sale to a public increasingly agi- tated by reports of the French minister's defiance of presidential authority, this caricature represents a Federalist demonology of the Republican opposition. Attributing Satanic origins and anti-Federalist roots to the party, the caricature presents an imaginary conclave of Republicans dedicated to philosophical anar- chism, moral relativism, unlimited popular sovereignty, and the overthrow of the federal government, and consisting of a motley assortment of politicians, savants, artisans, sailors, a black, and a revolutionary Frenchman. The figure standing on the table and dominating the group bears a strong resemblance to Jefferson, whom the artist could have met or seen when the Republican leader was serving as Secretary of State in New York City in 1790. The sentiments attributed to this figure were scarcely those of an aristocratic Virginia planter, but perhaps they were meant to satirize Jefferson's appeal to what many Feder- alists regarded as the lower orders of American society. (Courtesy of the Library Company of Philadelphia)

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