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Table of Contents of
The Papers of Thomas Jefferson
Volume 22

edited by
Julian P. Boyd


© 1950 - <2001> Princeton University Press

Reproduced 2003 with permission of the publisher

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CONTENTS

August 6, 1791 to December 1791
Foreword, vii Guide to Editorial Apparatus, xiii Illustrations, xxxvii
{ 1791 } continued
August 6-31 September October November December
Index ILLUSTRATIONS
August 6-31 From Charles Carter, [ca. 6 August], 3 From Tench Coxe, 6 August, 3 From David Humphreys, 6 August, 7 From Juan Nepomuceno de Quesada, 6 August, 7 From Benjamin Russell, 6 August, 7 To Arthur St. Clair, 6 August, 8 To John Cleves Symmes, 6 August, 8 To Francis Eppes, 7 August, 9 From Tobias Lear, 7 August, 10 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 7 August, 11 From Edward Rutledge, 7 August, 12 From Edward Rutledge, [7 August], 12 To George Washington, 7 August, 14 From Robert Adam, 8 August, 15 To Christopher Gore, 8 August, 15 From Daniel L. Hylton, 8 August, 16 From James Madison, 8 August, 17 From Joseph Fay, 9 August, 18 From Moustier, 9 August, 18 From William Short, 9 August, 19 From Ebenezer Stevens, 9 August, 23 From John Garland Jefferson, [ca. 10 August], 24 From Joshua Johnson, 10 August, 25 From Joshua Johnson, 10 August, 27 To Henry Knox, 10 August, 27 From Walter Boyd, 11 August, 28 From Nathaniel Burwell, 11 August, 28 To William Blount, 12 August, 29 From Edward Church, 12 August, 30 From Delamotte, 12 August, 31 From J. P. P. Derieux, 12 August, 31 To Jean Baptiste Ternant, 12 August, 32 The "Anas," EDITORIAL NOTE, 33 Notes of a Conversation with Alexander Hamilton, 13 August, 38 To Christian Baehr, 14 August, 39 To Sylvanus Bourne, 14 August, 40 To William Channing, 14 August, 41 To Uriah Forrest, 14 August, 41 From Thomas Greenleaf, 14 August, 41 To John Harvie, 14 August, 42 To David Jameson, 14 August, 43 To Martha Jefferson Randolph, 14 August, 43 From William Tatham, 15 August, 44 To Thomas Leiper, 16 August, 44 To William Blount, 17 August, 45 From David Humphreys, 17 August, 46 From David Humphreys, 18 August, 47 To Pierre Charles L'Enfant, 18 August, 47 To James Madison, 18 August, 48 From Benjamin Banneker, 19 August, 49 From William Carmichael, 19 August, 54 From C. W. F. Dumas, 19 August, 55 From David Rittenhouse, [ca. 20 August], 55 To Mary Jefferson, 21 August, 56 From James Cole Mountflorence, 21 August, 56 From George Washington, 21 August, 57 To William Blount, 22 August, 57 To Thomas Harwood, 22 August, 58 From David Humphreys, 22 August, 59 From James Maury, 22 August, 59 From Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 22 August, 60 From Thomas FitzSimons, 23 August, 61 To David Humphreys, 23 August, 61 To George Washington, 23 August, 62 To William Carmichael, 24 August, 63 To Thomas Leiper, 24 August, 64 From Thomas Newton, Jr., 24 August, 65 From Nathaniel Randolph, 24 August, 65 From William Short, 24 August, 66 To Sir John Sinclair, 24 August, 72 From Joel Barlow, 25 August, 73 To Edward Rutledge, 25 August, 73 To Nathaniel Burwell, 26 August, 75 From James Currie, 26 August, 76 From Alexander Hamilton, 26 August, 77 To James Madison, 26 August, 77 To John Paradise, 26 August, 78 To John Ross, 26 August, 79 From William Tatham, [before 26 August], 79 From Thomas Harwood, 27 August, 85 From Harry Innes, 27 August, 86 From John Ross, 27 August, 87 To Commissioners of the Federal District, 28 August, 88 Queries for D. C. Commissioners, [ca. 28 August], 89 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 28 August, 91 To James Brown, 29 August, 92 To Joshua Johnson, 29 August, 92 To Thomas Johnson, 29 August, 94 To David Ross, 29 August, 95 To William Short, 29 August, 95 From George Washington, 29 August, 97 To Benjamin Banneker, 30 August, 97 To Condorcet, 30 August, 98 To James Currie, 30 August, 99 To Delamotte, 30 August, 100 To James Duane, 30 August, 101 To C. W. F. Dumas, 30 August, 102 To Joseph Fay, 30 August, 102 To Joseph Fenwick, 30 August, 103 To James Maury, 30 August, 104 To Gouverneur Morris, 30 August, 104 From William Short, 30 August, 105 From Joseph Fenwick, 31 August, 108 To Alexander Hamilton, 31 August, 109 From Alexander Hamilton, [31 August], 110 From David Humphreys, 31 August, 110 To John Paul Jones, 31 August, 111 To Thomas Leiper, 31 August, 112 To Pierre Charles L'Enfant, 31 August, 112 From Peyton Short, 31 August, 112 From William Short, 31 August, 113 Legal Opinion of Edmund Randolph, [ca. August], 114 September From William Barton, 1 September, 116 From George Clymer, 1 September, 117 To Madame de Rausan, 1 September, 117 Henry Remsen, Jr. to Tobias Lear, 1 September, 117 To William Short, 1 September, 118 From Daniel Smith, 1 September, 119 To Jean Baptiste Ternant, 1 September, 119 From Francis Eppes, 2 September, 120 Memorandum for Henry Remsen, Jr., [2 September], 121 From Stephen Cathalan, Jr., enclosing report on the Algiers affair, 4 September, 122 From William Short, 4 September, 125 From Henry Skipwith, 4 September, 127 From William Short, 5 September, 129 From David Hartley, 6 September, 130 From James Brown, 7 September, 131 From William Knox, 7 September, 132 From Thomas Auldjo, 8 September, 132 From Sylvanus Bourne, 8 September, 133 To Thomas Newton, Jr., 8 September, 134 To George Washington, 8 September, 136 From Willing, Morris & Swanwick, 8 September, 137 From Henry Remsen, Jr., 9 September, 137 From David Humphreys, 10 September, 138 From Ezra L'Hommedieu, 10 September, 139 From Tubeuf, 10 September, 141 From Joshua Johnson, 12 September, 142 From James Swan, 12 September, 143 From James Maury, 14 September, 144 From William Short, 14 September, 144 From Edward Stevens, 14 September, 146 To Augustine Davis, 15 September, 147 To Andrew Ellicott, 15 September, 147 To Adam Lindsay, 15 September, 148 To James Lyle, 15 September, 148 From C. W. F. Dumas, 17 September, 149 From William Blount, 19 September, 150 From Joseph Fay, 20 September, 150 From John Harvie, 20 September, 151 From Joseph Atkinson, 21 September, 154 To James Wilson, 21 September, 160 From William Short, 22 September, 160 From David Humphreys, 23 September, 163 From John Skey Eustace, 24 September, 164 To Nicholas Lewis, 24 September, 165 From Joseph Fenwick, 25 September, 166 From William Short, 25 September, 167 To James Brown, 27 September, 169 From David Humphreys, 27 September, 169 From Augustine Davis, 28 September, 170 From William Short, 29 September, 171 From William Short, 29 September, 173 From Harry Innes, 30 September, 175 From Joshua Johnson, 30 September, 177 From George Twyman, [ca. 30 September], 179 October From C. W. F. Dumas, 1 October, 179 From David Humphreys, 1 October, 180 From Fulwar Skipwith, 1 October, 180 From Joseph Fenwick, 2 October, 181 From William Short, 2 October, 181 From James Currie, 3 October, 183 From Gouverneur Morris, 3 October, 183 From David Jameson, 4 October, 184 From Daniel Smith, 4 October, 185 To Francis Eppes, 5 October, 185 To Robert Lewis, 5 October, 186 To Robert Lewis, Jr., 5 October, 187 To Henry Skipwith, 5 October, 187 From James Yard, 5 October, 189 To David Meade Randolph, 6 October, 189 From William Short, 6 October, 189 To Tubeuf, 6 October, 195 To Francis Walker, 6 October, 196 To James Wilson, 6 October, 197 To John Bolling, 7 October, 198 To Andrew Donald, 7 October, 199 To James Lyle, 7 October, 199 To Nathaniel Pope, 7 October, 201 From Edward Rutledge, 7 October, 201 To James Strange, 7 October, 203 From William Short, 9 October, 205 From William Tatham, 9 October, 207 To the Rev. Matthew Maury, 10 October, 208 From Thomas Bell, 11 October, 208 From John Hamilton, 11 October, 209 To John Garland Jefferson, 11 October, 209 To Nicholas Lewis, 11 October, 211 To Anderson Bryan, 12 October, 211 From William Short, 14 October, 212 From Delamotte, 15 October, 215 From Peyton Short, 15 October, 215 From William Short, 15 October, 215 From William Short, 15 October, 217 From David Humphreys, 16 October, 218 From Augustine Davis, 17 October, 219 From David Meade Randolph, 17 October, 219 To Mary Jefferson, 18 October, 220 From Uriah Forrest, 19 October, 220 From James Brown, 21 October, 221 From William Short, 22 October, 221 From Archibald Stuart, 22 October, 223 From James McHenry, 23 October, 224 To George Washington, 23 October, 225 From Francis Eppes, 24 October, 226 Report on Census, 24 October, 227 From John Trumbull, 24 October, 228 From Willink, Van Staphorst & Hubbard, enclosing TJ's account current, 24 October, 228 To James Brown, 25 October, 231 To J. P. P. Derieux, 25 October, 232 To the Rev. Matthew Maury, 25 October, 232 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 25 October, 233 From C. W. F. Dumas, 26 October, 234 To George Hammond, 26 October, 234 From George Hammond, 26 October, 235 The President to the House of Representatives, 26 October, 235 From Delamotte, 27 October, 236 From Thomas Pleasants, Jr., 27 October, 237 From Louis Alexandre, 28 October, 237 From Thomas Barclay, 28 October, 238 From Joseph Fenwick, 28 October, 238 From Joseph Fenwick, 28 October, 239 From David Humphreys, 28 October, 239 From George Hammond, 30 October, 241 From James Brown, 31 October, 243 From Francis Eppes, 31 October, 244 November From Tench Coxe, 1 November, 244 From Jonathan N. Havens and Sylvester Dering, 1 November, 244 From Thomas Hemming, 1 November, 252 From Archibald McCalester, 1 November, 253 From Edmund Randolph, 2 November, 255 From Elizabeth Carter, 3 November, 256 From Samuel Smith, 5 November, 257 To William Carmichael, 6 November, 258 To Francis Eppes, 6 November, 259 To Thomas Mifflin, 6 November, 260 From Gouverneur Morris, 6 November, 260 To Thomas Pinckney, 6 November, 261 To George Washington, 6 November, 263 From Seth Jenkins, 7 November, 264 From Gouverneur Morris, 7 November, 265 To George Washington, 7 November, 266 From William Prince, 8 November, 268 From William Short, 8 November, 270 From John Street, 8 November, 273 To George Washington, enclosing Report on Public Lands, 8 November, 274 To William Short, 9 November, 288 To Samuel Smith, 9 November, 288 To Lord Wycombe, 9 November, 289 To David Campbell, 10 November, 290 From James Maury, 10 November, 290 To George Washington, 10 November, 291 To James Madison, 11 November, 291 From Daniel L. Hylton, 12 November, 292 From James Cole Mountflorence, 12 November, 293 To Francis Eppes, 13 November, 293 To Ebenezer Hazard, 13 November, 294 To Martha Jefferson Randolph, 13 November, 294 To Hugh Williamson, 13 November, 295 Report on Petition of William How, 14 November, 295 Report on Petition of Charles Colvill, 14 November, 296 Report on Petition of John Mangnall, 14 November, 298 To George Washington, 14 November, 300 From J. P. P. Derieux, 15 November, 301 To William Short, 16 November,.301 To Jean Baptiste Ternant, 16 November, 302 From George Muter, 17 November, 302 To William Short, 17 November, 304 To Samuel Smith, 17 November, 304 From Caspar Wistar, Jr., 17 November, 305 From James Hutchinson, 18 November, 305 From David Campbell, 19 November, 305 From Francis Eppes, 19 November, 306 From John Ettwein, 19 November, 306 From Thomas Barclay, 20 November, 310 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 20 November, 310 To the Commissioners of the Federal District, 21 November, 311 From Sharp Delany, 21 November, 312 To Andrew Ellicott, 21 November, 312 To Lafayette, 21 November, 313 From William Short, 21 November, 313 From Fulwar Skipwith, 21 November, 317 To the Speaker of the House of Representatives, enclosing Report on Desalination of Sea Water, 21 November, 318 From David Humphreys, 22 November, 322 From La Rochefoucauld, [22 November], 323 To Tobias Lear, [22 November], 324 From Thomas Barclay, 23 November, 326 To Alexander Donald, enclosing Lackington's Catalogue for 1792, [23 November], 326 To William Short, 24 November, 328 From C. W. F. Dumas, 25 November, 332 To William Short, 25 November, 333 To John Adams, 26 November, 335 From George Hammond, 26 November, 336 To George Washington, 26 November, 344 Proposed Treaty of Commerce with France, [26 November], 346 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 27 November, 348 To James Brown, 28 November, 348 To William Carmichael, 29 November, 349 From Nathaniel Cutting, 29 November, 349 From Joseph Fay, 29 November, 351 To George Hammond, 29 November, 352 To David Humphreys, 29 November, 353 To Thomas Leiper, 29 November, 354 From Thomas Pinckney, 29 November, 354 From Andrew Ellicott, 30 November, 356 From George Hammond, 30 November, 356 From George Washington, 30 November, 358 December A Bill to Promote the Progress of the Useful Arts, [1 December], 359 From Augustine Davis, 1 December, 362 From Thomas Pinckney, 1 December, 363 Plan of a Bill concerning Consuls, [1 December], 364 To James Somerville, 1 December, 367 To George Washington, enclosing drafts of letters of Washington to the Commissioners of the Federal District and Washington to L'Enfant, 1 December, 367 From Pierce Butler, 2 December, 369 To Pierce Butler, enclosing drafts of Secret Resolutions to the Senate and to Both Houses of Congress, 2 December, 369 From Charles Willson Peale, [after 3 December], 372 From James Brown, 4 December, 372 From Nathaniel Cutting, 4 December, 373 To John Dobson, 4 December, 374 From David Humphreys, 4 December, 375 From Adam Lindsay, 4 December, 376 To Martha Jefferson Randolph, 4 December, 376 To John Cleves Symmes, 4 December, 377 To John Dobson, 5 December, 378 To George Hammond, 5 December, 378 To Daniel L. Hylton, 5 December, 379 To Edmund Randolph, 5 December, 379 From Edmund Randolph, [5 December], 380 From George Hammond, 6 December, 380 Memorandum of Conversation with Jose de Jaudenes, 6 December, 381 From Jonathan Dayton, 7 December, 382 George Washington to Beverley Randolph, 7 December, 382 From Tench Coxe, 8 December, 383 To John Adams, 9 December, 383 To Thomas Barclay, 9 December, 384 Report on Petition of Samuel Breck and Others, 9 December, 384 From Daniel Smith, 9 December, 385 From George Washington, [9 December], 386 From Sylvanus Bourne, 10 December, 386 From the Commissioners of the Federal District, 10 December, 388 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 11 December, 389 To George Washington, enclosing Observations on L'Enfant's letter of 7 December, 11 December, 390 From Richard Bruce, 12 December, 393 From Daniel Carroll, 12 December, 393 To George Hammond, enclosing extract of a letter on British incitement of Indians, 12 December, 394 Report on Matters for Negotiation with Great Britain, 12 December, 395 From Jose Ignacio de Viar, 12 December, 396 From Thomas Barclay, 13 December, 398 To Christopher Gore, 13 December, 399 To George Hammond, 13 December, 399 To David Humphreys, 13 December, 400 From Charles Willson Peale, [13? December], 400 To Jose Ignacio de Viar, 13 December, 400 To George Washington, 13 December, 402 From George Hammond, 14 December, 402 From George Hammond, 14 December, 402 From George Washington, 14 December, 404 To Nathaniel Barrett, 15 December, 405 From Tench Coxe, 15 December, 405 To the Governors of Georgia and South Carolina, enclosing copies of Juan Nepomuceno de Quesada to James Seagrove, Seagrove to de Quesada, and their Agreement, 15 December, 406 To George Hammond, 15 December, 409 From Edward Church, 16 December, 412 To Tench Coxe, 16 December, 414 To George Washington, enclosing sketch of a message on the protection of western citizens, 16 December, 415 From Thomas Barclay, 18 December, 416 To Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr., 18 December, 418 From George Washington, 18 December, 420 From Delamotte, 19 December, 421 From George Hammond, 19 December, 422 From Martin de Villeneuve, 19 December, 422 Report on Sale of Lands on Lake Erie, 19 December, 423 To Adam Lindsay, 20 December, 425 To George Washington, enclosing copy of the statement on the affair between Pennsylvania and Virginia, 20 December, 425 To Jose Ignacio de Viar and Jose de Jaudenes, 21 December, 427 To Jonathan N. Havens and Sylvester Dering, 22 December, 428 From Daniel L. Hylton, 22 December, 428 To Ezra L'Hommedieu, 22 December, 429 To Archibald McCalester, 22 December, 429 To Eliphalet Pearson, 22 December, 430 From Martin de Villeneuve, 22 December, 431 Note on the Subject of Vacant Consulships, 22 December, 431 Report on Negotiations with Spain, 22 December, 432 To Alexander Hamilton, 23 December, 433 From David Humphreys, 23 December, 434 To Archibald Stuart, 23 December, 435 To George Washington, enclosing table on the Footing of the Commerce of the United States with France and England, 23 December, 437 To William Blount, 24 December, 441 From Joseph Fenwick, 24 December, 441 To Daniel L. Hylton, 24 December, 443 To Henry Mullins, 24 December, 444 To Daniel Smith, 24 December, 444 Notes on Conversation on Rufus King, 25 December, 445 To Martha Jefferson Randolph, 25 December, 446 From George Washington, 25 December, 446 From George Washington, 25 December, 447 From Thomas Barclay, 26 December, 447 From William Blount, 26 December, 448 From Lewis Littlepage, 26 December, 449 From James Currie, 27 December, 458 Memorandum of Conversation with Jose de Jaudenes, 27 December, 459 From George Washington, [27 December], 459 From Nathaniel Cutting, 28 December, 459 From Nicholas Forster, 28 December, 465 From George Hammond, 28 December, 466 To George Hammond, 28 December, 467 From Robert R. Livingston, 28 December, 467 From Sylvanus Bourne, 29 December, 468 To Sylvanus Bourne, 30 December, 468 From William Short, 30 December, 469 From Thomas Barclay, 31 December, 471 From Thomas Barclay, 31 December, 472 From William Barton, 31 December, 473 From C. W. F. Dumas, 31 December, 473 From Joshua Johnson, 31 December, 474 Index, 475
ILLUSTRATIONS
Following page 246
THOMAS JEFFERSON Charles Willson Peale's celebrated portrait of Jefferson, painted in Phila- delphia in December 1791, has had a checkered history. This work was re- garded as a life portrait of Jefferson until 1944, when Fiske Kimball declared that it was actually an early copy by someone other than Peale. Kimball's opinion held sway for almost a decade until careful scientific analyses by Eliz- abeth Jones and Anne Clapp proved conclusively that this painting is indeed the original life portrait by Peale. But if the provenance of this work was once in doubt, there has never been any question about its iconographic significance. As the first portrait of Jefferson to be widely disseminated through prints before his election to the presidency, it had an immense impact on the American people's visual perception of the Virginia statesman (Alfred L. Bush, The Life Portraits of Thomas Jefferson [Charlottesville, Va., 1962], p. 31-3). (Courtesy of Independence National Historical Park, Philadelphia) GEORGE HAMMOND (1763-1853) Hammond, who arrived in Philadelphia in October 1791 as the first British minister to the United States, was the scion of an English country family and a graduate of Oxford. After serving as David Hartley's private secretary during the peace negotiations between America and Britain that brought the Revo- lutionary War to a close, Hammond held a series of minor diplomatic offices in Vienna, Copenhagen, and Madrid before being posted to the United States under the patronage of Lord Grenville. Charged by his government to prevent the passage of discriminatory legislation against British commerce and to dis- cuss infractions of the Treaty of Peace, Hammond entered into a series of negotiations with Jefferson that ultimately failed to resolve the most outstanding points at issue between their respective nations. Portrait painted by John Trumbull in 1792. (Courtesy of Yale University Art Gallery) JEAN BAPTISTE TERNANT (1751-1816) Terant arrived in Philadelphia in August 1791 as Louis XVI's last minister to the United States. Unlike his British counterpart, Ternant brought an in- timate knowledge of the new American nation to his task, having forsaken his lieutenancy in the Royal Corps of Engineers to join the Continental Army in 1778. Ternant served the American cause with distinction for almost five years, attaining the position of inspector of Continental forces in the Southern De- partment and rising to the rank of colonel. Though in general they worked together harmoniously, Terant was disappointed by the reserve with which Jefferson treated him, thereby mistaking the Secretary of State's adherence to diplomatic niceties for personal aloofness. Portrait painted by Charles Willson Peale in 1781. (Courtesy of Independence National Historical Park, Philadelphia) THOMAS PINCKNEY (1750-1828) The first American minister to Great Britain to be appointed under the new federal government, Pinckney was the offspring of a distinguished South Car- olina family. He received a cosmopolitan education, studying in England at Westminster School, Oxford, and the Middle Temple and in France at the Royal Military Academy. After compiling a distinguished record of military service during the American Revolution, Pinckney practiced law and served as governor of his native state during the Confederation period. Some contem- poraries took note of Pinckney's English education and concluded that his appointment as minister was an act of appeasement to Great Britain, but Wash- ington strongly denied this, and Pinckney's own behavior in London was that of a vigorous defender of American national interests. Portrait painted by John Trumbull in 1791. (Courtesy of Yale University Art Gallery) GOUVERNEUR MORRIS (1752-1816) Morris' nomination to succeed Jefferson as minister to France came as a distinct shock and surprise to the Secretary of State. Washington decided on this nomination without consulting Jefferson beforehand and remained adamant in the face of an effort by Jefferson to persuade him to dispatch Thomas Pinckney to Paris instead. Morris' nomination was a source of great unease to Jefferson because of the aristocratic New Yorker's well-known contempt for the French Revolution. But as soon as Jefferson realized that Washington was intent on submitting Morris' name to the Senate, he loyally refrained from any further opposition to the nomination. Portrait painted by James Sharples in 1810. (Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.) FIRST U.S. CENSUS, 1791 Title page and last page of the first publication of the Census of 1790 by Childs and Swaine of Philadelphia, entitled Return of the Whole Number of Persons within the Several Districts of the United States and consisting of 56 pages, the last bearing Jefferson's signature. (Courtesy of Princeton University Library) WILLIAM TATHAM (1752-1819) Tatham, the English-born son of an Anglican rector, was a man of many parts. After immigrating to Virginia at the age of seventeen, he worked as a clerk for merchants there and in the Tennessee country, mastered the elements of engineering and surveying, served as an Indian fighter in western North Carolina and as a volunteer cavalryman in Virginia during the Revolutionary War, and became a member of the North Carolina bar and state legislature during the Confederation period. Long interested in western exploration, Tatham was co-author in 1780 of the first history of Kentucky, a manuscript that was never published and has since been lost. Appointed state geographer of Virginia in 1789, Tatham was keenly interested at this time in enlisting Jefferson's support for two publication projects he never brought to fruition-a history and a topographical analysis of Virginia. Portrait by Thomas Barrow. (Courtesy of Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc., New York City) DAVID RITTENHOUSE (1732-1796) This noted astronomer was the foremost American scientist of his age. Jef- ferson was an ardent admirer and close confidant of Rittenhouse, whose sci- entific achievements he proudly cited in Notes on the State of Virginia to refute European allegations about the degeneration of the human species in the New World. As Secretary of State, Jefferson regularly conferred with Rittenhouse when called upon to prepare state papers of a scientific nature, most notably in the case of his 1790 Report on Weights and Measures, but also with respect to the Report on Desalination of Sea Water printed in this volume. Portrait by Charles Willson Peale in 1791 to commemorate Rittenhouse's election as president of the American Philosophical Society. (Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society) ANAS This 13 Aug. 1791 account of a conversation with Alexander Hamilton is the first entry in the work that has come to be known as Jefferson's "Anas." A miscellaneous collection of political anecdotes, gossip, and observations by Jefferson, it scandalized his critics and heartened his supporters when it was first published in 1829, and has been an important source for historians of the early national period ever since. Originally conceived by Jefferson to cover only his years as Secretary of State and to serve as a counterweight to the unabashedly pro-Federalist account of the party strife of the 1790s in John Marshall's Life of George Washington, 5 vols. (Philadelphia, 1805-1807), the Anas has been extended in scope by all previous editors of Jefferson's papers to include similar documents from his vice-presidential and presidential years as well. (Courtesy of the Library of Congress)

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