Contributor biographical information for Public relations for the new Europe / Trevor Morris and Simon Goldsworthy.


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TREVOR MORRIS is one of the UK's most senior PR practitioners and since 2005 a Visiting Professor at the University of Westminster in London, where he teaches on a range of postgraduate and undergraduate programs. Formerly Morris was Chief Executive of Chime Communications Public Relations Group, the UK [(and Europe)]'s largest PR group, with some 250 employees. In nearly a quarter of a century in the industry he successfully built a major PR consultancy, worked for numerous major companies and government bodies and alongside most of the key players in contemporary PR. Morris has made countless TV, radio and newspaper appearances and maintains a high profile within the industry.

SIMON GOLDSWORTHY is Senior Lecturer in Public Communication at the University of Westminster, UK. He has a first class honours degree in east European history and has travelled extensively in east and central Europe. He established London's first Master of Arts course in Public Relations and has since added the teaching of Public Relations at undergraduate level. He has lectured to international audiences, including Johns Hopkins University and at the Sorbonne, where he is a Visiting Professor. His UK civil service career included three years at the Central Office of Information and press office work for a number of British Government departments. He has also worked as a PR consultant in the private sector.
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Library of Congress subject headings for this publication:
Public relations -- Europe.
Crisis management -- Europe.
Mass media -- European Union countries.