Table of contents for Magic in the ancient Greek world / Derek Collins.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog


Information from electronic data provided by the publisher. May be incomplete or contain other coding.


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Acknowledgments.
Abbreviations.
Introduction.
Part I: Magic: What Is It and How Does It Work?.
Frazer and Tylor.
Malinowski.
Magic as Communication.
Le;vy-Bruhl.
Evans-Pritchard.
Sympathetic Magic.
Magic and the Extended Person.
Magic and Analogy.
Beyond Frazer.
Tambiah and Persuasive Magic.
Conclusion.
Part II: A Framework for Greek Magic.
Magic and the Gods.
Divinity and Nature.
The Hippocratics: Magic, Divination, and Epilepsy.
Plato and Greek Psychology.
Magic and Causality.
Greek Magicians.
Magoi.
Gorgias, mageia and goēteia.
Other Magical Terms.
Conclusion.
Part III: Binding Magic and Erotic Figurines.
Binding the Gods.
Divine Agents.
‘Characters’.
Body Parts and Health.
Erotic Magic.
Figurines.
Erōtes.
Part IV: Homeric Incantations.
Pythagoras and Empedocles.
The Mechanics of Homeric Incantations.
Obstetrics and Gynecology.
Verse Combinations and the Power of Metaphor.
Intoxication, Choking, and Gout.
Incantations and Divination.
Neoplatonic Theurgy and Homer.
Conclusion.
Part V: Magic in Greek and Roman Law.
Magic in Greek Law and Legal Imagination.
Trials for Erotic Magic.
Theoris, the Lemnian Witch.
Plato’s Laws Against Magic.
Magic in Roman Law and Legal History.
The Twelve Tables.
The Lex Cornelia.
Magia and Maleficium: Magic and Witchcraft.
Apuleius the Magus.
The Opinions of Paulus and Later Law Codes.
Interpretationes Christianae.
The Medieval Inheritance.
Conclusion.
Bibliography.
Index


Library of Congress subject headings for this publication:
Magic, Greek.