Publisher description for Just wars : from Cicero to Iraq / Alex J. Bellamy.


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In what circumstances is it legitimate to use force? How should force be used? These are two of the most crucial questions confronting world politics today.
The Just War tradition provides a set of criteria which political leaders and soldiers use to defend and rationalize war. This book explores the evolution of thinking about just wars and examines its role in shaping contemporary judgements about the use of force, from grand strategic issues of whether states have a right to pre-emptive
self-defence, to the minutiae of targeting.
Bellamy maps the evolution of the Just War tradition, demonstrating how it arose from a myriad of sub-traditions, including scholasticism, the holy war tradition, chivalry, natural law, positive law, Erasmus and Kant's reformism, and realism from Machiavelli to Morgenthau. He then applies this tradition to a range of contemporary normative dilemmas related to terrorism, pre-emption, aerial bombardment and humanitarian intervention.


Library of Congress subject headings for this publication:
War -- Moral and ethical aspects.
International relations -- Moral and ethical aspects.
Just war doctrine.