Contributor biographical information for Immigrant youth in cultural transition : acculturation, identity, and adaptation across national contexts / by John W. Berry ... [et al.].


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John W. Berry, Ph.D. is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Queen's University, Canada. He obtained his B.A. at Sir George Williams University (Montreal), his Ph.D. at the University of Edinburgh (Scotland). He has received Honorary Doctorates from the University of Athens, and Universite de Geneve, and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Academy for Intercultural Research. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association, and of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology. He has published over 30 books in the areas of cross-cultural, social, and cognitive psychology, including co-authoring the textbook, Cross-Cultural Psychology: Research and Applications, [Cambridge University Press, 2002], and co-editing the three-volume Handbook of Cross-Cultural Psychology [Allyn & Bacon, 1997]. His main research interests are in the areas of acculturation and intercultural relations, with an emphasis on applications to immigration, educational and health policy.
Jean Phinney is a Professor of Psychology at California State University, Los Angeles. She received her B.A. from Wellesley College and her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. For the past twenty years she has been studying ethnic identity, acculturation, and psychological well-being among adolescents and emerging adults from diverse ethnic and immigrant backgrounds in southern California. She has been consistently supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health. She has published extensively on ethnic and cultural issues, and her measure of ethnic identity, the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure, is widely used in research. Current research interests include a longitudinal study of factors that predict positive academic outcomes of ethnic minority and immigrant first generation college students.
David L. Sam, Ph.D. is professor of cross-cultural psychology at the University of Bergen, Norway, where he divides this position between the Schools of Psychology and Medicine. He teaches courses in developmental psychology, cross-cultural psychology and medical anthropology. His research interests include psychology of acculturation, and the role of culture in health and human development. He has published extensively on young immigrants’ adaptation. He is a co-editor of the Cambridge Handbook of Acculturation Psychology (2006). Sam’s interest in acculturation comes from his background as a migrant from Ghana—first as a foreign student, and now as a settled immigrant.
Paul Vedder, Ph.D. is professor of Cultural Diversity and Learning in the Department of Education at Leiden University. He obtained his Ph.D. in social and behavioral sciences from Groningen University in the Netherlands in 1985. His research focuses on cooperative learning, social competence, multilingualism, and interethnic relationships. Recent publications include a study on student motivation and the quality of cooperative learning in an ethnically diverse school population (together with Hijzen and Boekaerts, 2006), articles on contextual influences on immigrant adolescents’ acculturation and adaptation, and on ethnocultural variation in the availability of social support in schools (with Boekaerts and Seegers, 2005).



Library of Congress subject headings for this publication:
Immigrants -- Cultural assimilation -- Cross-cultural studies.
Teenage immigrants -- Social conditions -- Cross-cultural studies.
Acculturation -- Cross-cultural studies.