Publisher description for The uses of history in early modern England / edited by Paulina Kewes.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog


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The essays in this collection investigate the ways in which the past was exploited to meet the concerns of the present in early modern England. The understanding of the past in this period was characterized by a deepening and more fully articulated conception of time and history, with its roots in impassioned religious and political controversies. The discourses that arose from this dialogue informed and drew together a range of genres and activities: prose accounts, polemical tracts, poems, plays, romances, secret histories, novels. Although many of these genres are no longer recognized as history, early modern writers and readers treated them as such. In assessing the uses of the past, these essays consider "literary" and "factual" writings side by side, avoiding traditional chronological and disciplinary divisions and the artificial separation of secular from ecclesiastical history. Cumulatively, they supply the context and provide a vast array of evidence for the way in which the deployment of history for political, religious, moral, aesthetic, or commercial purposes shifted between the mid-sixteenth century and the late eighteenth.


Library of Congress subject headings for this publication:
Great Britain -- Historiography -- History.
Historiography -- Great Britain -- History -- 16th century.
Historiography -- Great Britain -- History -- 17th century.
Historiography -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century.