Publisher description for Disraeli : the Victorian Dandy who became prime minister / Christopher Hibbert.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog


Information from electronic data provided by the publisher. May be incomplete or contain other coding.


Counter
To Thomas Carlyle he was "not worth his weight in cold bacon," but, to Queen Victoria, Benjamin Disraeli was "the kindest Minister" she had ever had and a "dear and devoted friend." In this masterly biography by England's "outstanding popular historian" (A.N. Wilson), Christopher Hibbert reveals the personal life of one of the most fascinating men of the nineteenth century and England's most eccentric Prime Minister. A superb speaker, writer, and wit, Disraeli did not intend to be a politician. Born into a family of Jewish merchants, Disraeli was a conspicuous dandy, constantly in debt, and enjoyed many scandalous affairs until, in 1839, he married an eccentric widow twelve years older than him. As an antidote to his grief at his wife’s death in 1872, he threw himself into politics becoming Prime Minister for the second time in 1874, much to the Queen’s delight.



Library of Congress subject headings for this publication:
Disraeli, Benjamin, -- Earl of Beaconsfield, -- 1804-1881.
Great Britain -- Politics and government -- 1837-1901.
Prime ministers -- Great Britain -- Biography.