Publisher description for The fixer / Bernard Malamud.


Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of Congress catalog


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A classic that won Malamud both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award

The Fixer (1966) is Bernard Malamud's best-known and most acclaimed novel -- one that makes manifest his roots in Russian fiction, especially that of Isaac Babel.

Set in Kiev in 1911 during a period of heightened anti-Semitism, the novel tells the story of Yakov Bok, a Jewish handyman blamed for the brutal murder of a young Russian boy. Bok leaves his village to try his luck in Kiev, and after denying his Jewish identity, finds himself working for a member of the anti-Semitic Black Hundreds Society. When the boy is found nearly drained of blood in a cave, the Black Hundreds accuse the Jews of ritual murder. Arrested and imprisoned, Bok refuses to confess to a crime that he did not commit.



Library of Congress subject headings for this publication:
Jews -- Ukraine -- Fiction.
Trials (Murder) -- Fiction.
False testimony -- Fiction.
Kiev (Ukraine) -- Fiction.
Antisemitism -- Fiction.