Contributor biographical information for The molecular basis of cell cycle and growth control / edited by Gary S. Stein ... [et al.].


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Dr. Gary S. Stein is Haidak Distinguished Professor and Chairman, Department of Cell Biology, and Professor of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Professor of Medicine. He is also Deputy Director for Research at the University of Massachusetts Cancer Center._ The central theme of_Dr. Stein’s research has been to discover mechanisms controlling proliferation and differentiation with emphasis on compromised regulation that is linked with disease.__ Dr. Stein has also had major and lasting impact in skeletal biology, where he established the foundation for addressing bone tissue specific gene expression, and provided valuable insight into aberrations that accompany the onset and progression of skeletal disease. Dr. Arthur B. Pardee is Professor Emeritus, Harvard University. For over 20 years he was Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard University, and Chief, Division of Cell Growth and Regulation, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and has served as president of the American Society of Biological Chemists and American Association for Cancer Research._ Dr. Pardee's pioneering work in mammalian cells is the foundation for our current understanding of mechanisms that govern competency for proliferation and cell cycle progression.


Library of Congress subject headings for this publication:
Cell cycle.
Cellular control mechanisms.
Cellular signal transduction.
Cell differentiation -- Molecular aspects.