Publisher description for Chess for dummies / by James Eade.


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Counter Many consider chess to be the best game ever invented. Chess imposes a set of rules and has finite limits, but just as you start to think you’re finally solving its mysteries, chess thwarts you. Sometimes, therefore, the game is frustrating, but far more often, chess proves both surprising and delightful. The deeper you get into chess, the more of its secrets you unearth — but the game has never been tapped out. Even today’s monster computers are far from playing the theorized “perfect” chess game. Chess For Dummies is for anyone who wants to become a better chess player. Whether you’ve been playing chess for years or never played at all, this clearly written and easy-to-understand guide will help you to <ul type="disc"> Apply the rules of chess to maximize winning Understand the lingo involved in the game Find other players who are just about at your own level Teach others how to play the game Explore move-by-move what it takes for you to be the one proudly saying, “Checkmate” at the end of your chess game. Chess For Dummies also covers the following topics and more: <ul type="disc"> Setting up the board The pieces and their powers Pattern recognition What to do throughout the game, from start to end Whom to play, when, where, and how Online and computer chess Chess notation Ever since chess originated in the 17th century in ancient India, it has grown to become recognized as the most ancient, intellectual, and cultural game of its time. Its combination of sport, scientific thinking, and the elements of art make it one of the most played games in the world. This book shows you everything you need to know in order to unearth the secrets and philosophies of chess.

Library of Congress subject headings for this publication: Chess